CRUMB

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 21, 1995

Starring: Robert Crumb & Aline Kominsky

Genre: Documentary

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 122 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Terry Zwigoff EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Lawrence Wilkinson,
Albert Berger & Lianne Halfon

Executive Producer:

Producer: Lawrence Wilkinson, Albert
Berger & Lianne
Halfon PRODUCERS: Lynn
O'Donnell & Terry Zwigoff

Writer: Terry Zwigoff

Address Comments To:

Content:

(H, PC, AB, LLL, SSS, NNN, D, NA) Humanistic, politically correct worldview, condoning hedonism, rejecting biblical religion & promoting hard-core pornography; 16 obscenities, 21 profanities & much vulgar language throughout; numerous pornographic cartoons depicting fornication, sodomy, incest, & other obscene acts; full male & female nudity; tolerance of illicit drugs; and, some New Age Eastern mysticism.

Summary:

CRUMB is a well crafted documentary about the irreverent satirical cartoonist Robert Crumb. Though it does examine some interesting psychological concepts, it also depicts and applauds pornography masquerading as art. The tragedy of the wasted lives and talents of the Crumb brothers, and the acceptance of immoral behavior, render this film grotesque and depressing.

Review:

CRUMB is a well crafted documentary about the irreverent, satirical cartoonist Robert Crumb. Many may remember his work from the 60s and 70s: FRITZ THE CAT, KEEP ON TRUCKIN' and numerous underground comics. This irreverent artist lampooned society, the Vietnam war, racism, and the wealthy. Crumb's rise to success is graphically outlined through a series of photos, cartoons and interviews with him, his friends, art critics, associates, and family. Robert, along with his two brothers, grew up during the late fifties in an extremely dysfunctional family. All three brothers exhibited bizarre, introverted behavior, obsessed with sex but talented cartoonists. They expressed themselves by creating a series of sophisticated comic books, ultimately leading Robert to create his bizarre comics and achieve success in the drug-laden, free-love counterculture of the radical sixties.

Though the film drags on too long, it does examine some interesting concepts. However, it also depicts and applauds pornography masquerading as art. CRUMB does not judge the strange behavior of its subjects, and much of the movie is intended to be humorous. However, the tragedy of the wasted lives and the acceptance of immoral behavior, render this film grotesque and depressing.

In Brief: