DANGEROUS MINDS

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 11, 1995

Starring: Michelle Pfeiffer, George
Dzundza, Courtney B. Vance,
Bruklin Harris, Renoly
Santiago, & Wade Dominguez

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 99 minutes

Distributor: Buena Vista

Director: John N. Smith

Executive Producer:

Producer: Don Simpson & Jerry
Bruckheimer

Writer: Ronald Bass BASED ON A NOVEL
BY: LouAnne Johnson

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, LLL, V, A, D, M) Moral worldview extolling discipline and education; 25 obscenities & 3 vulgarities; brief fistfight & implied murder (shooting); and, alcohol use & implied drug use.

Summary:

When ex-marine LouAnne Johnson gets her first teaching job, she faces the challenging prospect of teaching DANGEROUS MINDS. These are poor, urban children who couldn't care less about education. Through unconventional means and a lot of love, she earns their respect and helps them become fine students. While not denying the rough elements of urban America, it actually provides a tasteful look at hope and the triumph of one person in the lives of many.

Review:

The inspirational drama DANGEROUS MINDS opens with ex-marine LouAnne Johnson visiting a suburban high school in northern California to inquire about a substitute teaching position. Teaching is Ms. Johnson's dream, and to her elation she is offered a full-time job at the upper-class high school. This sounds great to the green recruit who never thought that she would walk straight from her first interview into the classroom. However, Ms. Johnson soon finds out that her group of children are jaded, rebellious "ruffians" who have absolutely no interest in listening to what she has to say. LouAnne soon seeks to overcome her frustration with the students by finding ways to get their attention. The teenagers slowly turn to exemplary students, but as the caring teacher seeks to make a difference in their young lives, she encounters opposition from the school's authority figures, the student's parents, the curriculum, and at times, the students themselves.

The acting is superb and the absence of nudity and sex, as well as the sparsely applied violence in this film, should be commended. While not denying the rough elements of urban America through course language, it actually provides a tasteful look of hope and the triumph of one person in the lives of many.

In Brief: