GUILTY AS SIN

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 04, 1993

Starring: Don Johnson, Rebecca De Mornay, Jack Warden, & Stephen Lang

Genre: Suspense thriller

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 120 minutes

Distributor: Hollywood Pictures/Buena Vista Pictures/Walt Disney Company

Director: Sidney Lumet

Executive Producer:

Producer: Larry Cohen

Writer: Martin Ransohoff

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Content:

(H, LL, A/D, M, NN, SSS, V) Psychological thriller with exposure to characters with little moral conscience; 15 obscenities & 4 profanities; two partially nude scenes with implied fornication & sodomy; and, dialogue replete with references to violent accounts, but not that much shown.

Summary:

In GUILTY AS SIN, a man stands accused of killing his rich wife, and Rebecca De Mornay plays the attorney who, at first, believes he couldn't have done such a terrible thing. Regrettably, this well-produced psychological thriller is marred by: characters with little moral conscience; foul language; two partially nude scenes with implied fornication and sodomy; and, dialogue replete with references to violence, although not much violence is shown.

Review:

GUILTY AS SIN is a psychological thriller reminiscent to the Hitchcock hair raisers of the 50's and 60's. Rebecca De Mornay plays a defense attorney, Jennifer Haines, determined to win at any cost. From hired Mafia killers to men standing trial for the murder of their family, Haines discovers a way to absolve her clients' guilt. Her lifestyle is immoral and non-committal. A turn in events occurs when a dashing womanizer, David Greenhill (Don Johnson), implores her to take his case. Greenhill contends that he has been falsely accused of throwing his wife from a window to her death. After Greenhill presses her, she retorts: "Hasn't anyone ever said 'no' to you?" He responds quietly, "My wife said 'no' just before I threw her out the window."

GUILTY AS SIN moves quickly after the first half hour. The movie depends on the dramatic skills of De Mornay along with the believable split-personality of Don Johnson to build the chilling suspense, rather than exploding cars and buildings. The end reveals the heroine's rush toward any light that will aid her in the decision of what is truly right. Regrettably, this psychological thriller is marred by: characters with little moral conscience; foul language; two partially nude scenes with implied fornication and sodomy; and, dialogue replete with references to violence, although not much violence is shown.

In Brief: