JUDY BERLIN Add To My Top 10

Rebuffing Jewish Angst

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 25, 2000

Starring: Edie Falco, Aaron Harnick, Barbara Barrie, Madeline Kahn, & Bob Dishy

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: Not rated

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Shooting Gallery Films

Director: Eric Mendelsohn

Executive Producer:

Producer: Rocco Caruso

Writer: Eric Mendelsohn

Address Comments To:

Eamonn Bowles, President
Shooting Gallery Films
145 Avenue of the Americas, 7th Floor
New York City, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 243-3042
Fax: (212) 647-1392
Web Page: www.shootinggallery.com

Content:

(Ro, LL, V, S, M) Romantic worldview; 11 obscenities (including some “f” words) & 13 profanities; woman slaps other woman; no sex scenes but married man consoles & eventually kisses divorced woman, but abandons further adultery, & teacher clearly has desires for married principal; no nudity; no alcohol use; no smoking; and, despondent man wallows in self-pity.

Summary:

JUDY BERLIN is a comical, offbeat tale of Jewish angst in the middle class environs of New York’s Long Island. Taking place in a single day, this is a sweet-natured movie, with a mild romantic worldview, but it has some “f” words and a few strong profanities.

Review:

JUDY BERLIN is a small, critically acclaimed tale of Jewish angst set in the middle class environs of Long Island in New York. The focus of the story is on two Jewish families and their romantic relationships.

In the story, which takes place during a single day, David Gold has come home to his parents’ house. He’s in a despondent mood because his movie career isn’t going as he planned. Not only that, but he’s having trouble communicating his feelings to his parents. Meanwhile, his mother, Alice, and his father, Art, are having communication problems of their own. It doesn’t help matters that Alice seems to be losing her grip on reality.

Edie Falco from TV’s SOPRANOS plays the title character, a young, lively woman of 32. Judy plans to fly to Los Angeles at the end of the day, in order to pursue her acting career. She and David accidentally meet on the street and begin establishing a tentative romance. David seems drawn to her upbeat attitude, but, as a strange eclipse of the sun darkens the whole town for several hours, it looks like David’s doldrums could dampen Judy’s enthusiasm.

It also turns out that Judy’s mother, Sue, who’s an elementary teacher at the local public school, has fallen in love with David’s father, the school principal. Art apparently has similar feelings for Sue, but their passion lies unspoken between them. The movie follows their passionate, unrequited dance at the same time that it shows Art’s daffy housewife coping with her day by enjoying the surprises it has in store for her.

Both Judy and David’s mother, Alice, seem to have escaped the Jewish angst that has overcome the other characters in this movie. They have positive attitudes toward their life. Eventually, Art realizes that he’d rather be with Alice, and David decides that Judy just might succeed after all, despite the obstacles against her.

Many viewers will find that JUDY BERLIN sometimes moves at a snail’s pace. The characters of Judy and Alice add humor and life to the movie, however. The whole cast does a yeoman’s job, but it is worth noting that the late comic actress Madeline Kahn shines in her last role as Alice.

Although the resolutions of the two main conflicts in JUDY BERLIN are positive, they don’t really have a specific moral point to them. In the final analysis, this is a sweet-natured movie with a mild romantic worldview. Only the gratuitous use of some “f” words and a few strong profanities send the movie careening into territory best reserved for adult audiences.

In Brief:

JUDY BERLIN is a tale of Jewish angst in the middle class environs of New York’s Long Island. Edie Falco plays the title role, Judy Berlin, a 32-year-old woman who plans to move to Los Angeles to pursue her acting career. In one day, she begins a tentative romance with the despondent son of a married couple who are having problems communicating. Meanwhile, the son’s father, a school principal, considers starting an affair with Judy’s mother, who teaches in the same school. Eventually, the father realizes he’d rather stay with his daffy but endearing wife, and the son decides Judy just might succeed after all, despite the obstacles against her.

Many viewers will find that JUDY BERLIN sometimes moves at a snail’s pace. The characters of Judy and the son’s mother add humor and life to the movie, however. Although the resolutions of the two main conflicts in JUDY BERLIN are positive, they don’t have a moral point to them. In the final analysis, this is a sweet-natured movie with a mild romantic worldview. Only the gratuitous use of some “f” words and a few strong profanities send the movie into territory best reserved for adult audiences.