MOUSEHUNT

Mouse Droppings

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Nathan Lane, Lee Evans, Maury
Chaykin, & Christopher Walken

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Children, but MOVIEGUIDE
recommends no one under
13-years-old

Rating: PG

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: DreamWorks

Director: Gore Verbinski

Executive Producer:

Producer: Alan Riche, Tony Ludwig &
Bruce Cohen

Writer: Adam Rifkin

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey Katzenberg
DreamWorks
100 Universal Plaza, Bldg. 10
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
(818) 733-7000

Content:

(Pa, B, O, L, VVV, SS, N, A, D, M) Pagan worldview with some moral points & hints of spiritism; 5 obscenities, 3 profanities & several obscene gestures; constant slapstick violence, often offensive, including a corpse is catapulted into a sewer, a man is blown out of a chimney, a man is dragged through the floorboards of a house, men are attacked by mousetraps, men fall through ice, & woman's hair is set on fire; sexual innuendo between married couple, homosexual innuendo, man reaches down woman's dress & woman acts pleased, man reaches into man's pants searching for mouse, & several other offensive sexual situations; male nudity (though private parts are covered) when clothes are unraveled by string factory equipment; alcohol use; smoking; and, exterminator eats mouse droppings.


Summary:

MOUSEHUNT is not for children. It is a dreary, dark comedy about two brothers who inherit a decrepit house inhabited by a very troublesome mouse. Although the pacing is good and the acting is adequate, the story is just too dark and dreary with some way over the top slapstick violence.


Review:

Contrary to its advertising campaign, MOUSEHUNT is not for children. It is a dreary, dark comedy which displays a certain effete sensibility and certainly would be nightmarish for young children. Nathan Lane, the famous homosexual advocate from THE BIRDCAGE, stars with Lee Evans as brothers who inherit their father's decrepit string factory.
In the first scene, they are carrying the coffin down the steps of a cathedral, arguing with each other. A handle breaks, and their father goes catapulting into the sewer. The string business is no longer what it used to be, having been replaced by nylon and polyester cords. Ernie (Nathan Lane) wants to sell the business, while Lars (Lee Evans) wants to keep his promise to his father to hold onto the business.
Ernie runs the most successful restaurant in town, until the mayor comes in for dinner and a cockroach from one of the artifacts that Ernie brings back from his father's estate crawls into the mayor's dinner. In a disgusting scene, the mayor eats half the cockroach and keels over with a heart attack. Ernie is out of business. Meanwhile, Lars's wife gives up on him, because she assumes that he has no future.
The brothers both decide to investigate a lonely house which their father received as payment for a debt. The house turns out to be a lost architectural masterpiece in very decrepit condition. As they try to restore it, they find out that it is inhabited by a mouse who is extremely intelligent. (Sometimes there is a sense that the mouse is the latest incarnation of their deceased father.) Needless to say, as they restore the house and chase the mouse, they wreak havoc.
The mouse gets the better of them, until they finally catch him and ship him off to Cuba. The mouse is returned for insufficient postage, just in time for the auction which promises to earn the brothers millions of dollars were it not for the brothers' compulsive behavior in trying to catch the mouse.
Leaving the screening, many children said this was not a children's movie. Although the pacing is good and the acting is adequate, the story is just too dark, and the sets are just too dreary. The picture looks like a bad nightmare which is about to take a turn for the worse. The humor goes over the top, the slapstick violence is too sexual, the sexual innuendo is too blatant, and the depravity is too pronounced. At one point, the exterminator even eats one of the mouse droppings. For cleaner slapstick mayhem, check out MR. MAGOO.


In Brief:

MOUSEHUNT is not for children. It is a dreary, dark comedy starring Nathan Lane and Lee Evans as two brothers who inherit their father's decrepit string factory. At their father's funeral, a coffin handle breaks, and their father goes catapulting into the sewer. Ernie wants to sell the string business, but when the mayor eats a cockroach at Ernie's restaurant, he has to turn to his brother for help. They decide to investigate a lonely house which their father received in payment of a debt. The house turns out to be a lost architectural masterpiece in decrepit condition. As they try to restore it, they find out that it is inhabited by an intelligent mouse. Needless to say, as they restore the house and chase the mouse, they wreak havoc.
Leaving the screening, many children said this was not a children's movie. Although the pacing is good and the acting is adequate, the story is just too dark, and the sets are too dreary. The humor goes over the top, the slapstick violence is too sexual, the sexual innuendo is too blatant, and the depravity is too pronounced. At one point, the exterminator even eats one of the mouse droppings. For cleaner slapstick mayhem, check out MR. MAGOO.