NINE MONTHS Add To My Top 10

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 14, 1995

Starring: Hugh Grant, Julianne Moore, Tom Arnold, Joan Cusack, & Robin Williams

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 94 minutes

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Content:

(B, H, LLL, VV, S, NN, A) Ultimately a moral conclusion in this humanist movie promoting commitment, marriage & responsibility; 45 obscenities, 18 vulgarities & 3 profanities; slapstick violence including kite hitting man, swing hitting man, comic car accident, & comic fight scene; mild sexual innuendo among married couple; upper male nudity & painting of nude woman; and, alcohol use)

Summary:

It takes NINE MONTHS for Rebecca to deliver a son in this charming picture. The problem is she doesn't know if her boyfriend Samuel will be with her at the delivery. However, in the end, he marries her to make their son legitimate. Thus, in a summer where adultery is exalted, this film shines as a light-hearted and refreshing alternative promoting responsibility and commitment except for the conception out of wedlock and some vile language.

Review:

In NINE MONTHS, Samuel has a great job as a psychiatrist, and Rebecca as a ballet dancer. One day, they meet Marty and Gail. Rebecca and Samuel try to avoid them, but are reunited with them at a picnic hosted by Sean. When Gail announces that she is expecting a child, Rebecca swoons, and Samuel grimaces. Soon, Rebecca tells Samuel of her pregnancy, and Samuel nearly has an accident. As time passes, Samuel becomes more afraid of becoming a father. He can't function well and misses the doctor appointments. Eventually, Rebecca leaves Samuel to live with Marty and Gail. Samuel is shattered and seeks Sean's counsel. Sean encourages him to never let Rebecca go. Rebecca accepts Sam back, they get married and experience one of the most hilarious deliveries ever.

This picture harks back to the old Hollywood comedies, where the happy ending included a fantastic marriage. Regrettably, in 90's fashion the procreating is pre-marital. Accept unacceptable behavior, this film encourages men to be responsible. Furthermore, the film repeatedly talks about the beauty of new life. Also, Samuel remains faithful to Rebecca even when they are separated. Thus, in a summer where adultery is exalted, this film shines as a light-hearted and refreshing alternative promoting responsibility and commitment, except for the conception out of wedlock and some vile language.

In Brief: