THE YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF

Quirky Second Chance

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 26, 2010

Starring: William Hurt, Maria Bello,
Kristen Stewart, and Eddie
Redmayne

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 102 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Udayan Prasad

Executive Producer: Lillian Birnbaum

Producer: Arthur Cohn

Writer: Erin Dignam

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
Meyer Gottlieb, President
Samuel Goldwyn Films
9570 West Pico Blvd., 4th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 860-3100
Fax: (310) 860-3195

Content:

(C, B, H, VV, S, NN, AA, D, M) Light Christian redemptive worldview set in a postmodern world where the lead characters are morally and spiritually lost; 31 obscenities and 3 profanities; man slugs man who hits his head on a fire hydrant and dies, man hits a teenager, and beginnings of attempted rape; two implied fornications and beginnings of attempted rape; rear female nudity and upper male nudity; drinking to excess; smoking; and, lying.

Summary:

YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF is the story of four misfits in Louisiana who eventually get a second chance. This well-produced, well-acted drama presents a message of redemption, with a positive reference to church, but it is subtle. There is also implied unmarried sex, violence, foul language, and drinking alcohol to excess.

Review:

YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF is produced in Louisiana, but has a European sensibility. It is the story of four misfits who eventually get a second chance.

The movie opens with Bret, played by William Hurt, getting out of prison. He keeps having flashbacks of his romance with May, played by Maria Bello. At a country restaurant and store, he meets a quirky teenage girl named Martine, played by Kristen Stewart of TWILIGHT, who just dumped her boyfriend. In the same restaurant, goofing around, is a nerdy guy who claims to be an American Indian, but doesn’t look like one, named Gordon. They team up to head south. In a driving rainstorm, they are forced to stay in one motel room. Gordon starts to make advances on Martine. Bret stops it.

At another location, they are harassed by some teenagers. Bret beats one of them up. The police arrest him, but a friendly sergeant lets him go. Martine and Gordon find out that he was in prison for manslaughter, defending May’s honor. Martine and Gordon want Bret wants to go back to May, but after six years he’s not sure she wants him.

Eventually, these lost souls need a second chance.

Although it is subtle, this is a message of redemption. At a key scene, Bret goes into a church and sits alone for hours. On the other hand, these are pretty messy lives. There is implied unmarried sex, violence, foul language, and drinking alcohol to excess. And, Bret can’t kick his smoking habit. The acting is excellent. The photography and music are compelling. Regrettably, sometimes the movie drags, because of a lack of consistent jeopardy and foreshadowing.

In Brief:

YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF is the story of four misfits who get a second chance. It opens with Brett, played by William Hurt, getting out of prison. He keeps having flashbacks of his romance with May, played by Maria Bello. At a restaurant store, he meets a quirky teenage girl named Martine, played by Kristen Stewart of TWILIGHT, who just dumped her boyfriend. In the same restaurant, goofing around, is a nerdy guy who claims to be an American Indian, but doesn’t look it, named Gordy. They team up to head south. Brett wants to go back to May, but after six years, he’s not sure she wants him. Eventually, these lost souls get a second chance.

YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF is produced in Louisiana, but has a European sensibility. The movie presents a very subtle message of redemption. At a key scene, Bret goes into a church and sits alone for hours. On the other hand, these are pretty messy lives. There is implied unmarried sex, violence, foul language, and drinking alcohol to excess. The acting is excellent. The music is compelling. Regrettably, sometimes the movie drags, because of a lack of jeopardy and foreshadowing.