UP AND DOWN Add To My Top 10

The Global Village Comes to Prague

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 25, 2005

Starring: Petr Forman, Jiri Machacek, Emilia Vasaryova, Ingrid Timkova, and Jan Triska

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 108 minutes

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Director: Jan Hrebejk

Executive Producer: Milan Kuchynka

Producer: Ondrej Trojan

Writer: Petr Jarchovsky

Address Comments To:

Michael Barker, Tom Bernard and Marcie Bloom
Co-Presidents
Sony Pictures Classics
550 Madison Avenue, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10022
Phone: (212) 833-8833
Web Page: http://www.sonyclassics.com
Email: Sony_Classics@spe.sony.com

Content:

(H, B, PC, LLL, VV, SS, NN, AA, D, MM) Light humanist worldview with some moral elements attacking racism, and some politically correct themes about racial conflict and immigration; at least 42 mostly strong obscenities, four strong profanities, three light profanities, and a few racial slurs; brief strong violence such as man punches man off screen and then bangs his head into wall and floor, man drags unconscious beaten man across floor with head wound leaving a streak of blood, prostitute wipes up some blood with a paper towel under her shoe, man uses martial arts to fend off two muggers; depicted oral sex in one scene, implied prostitution, and themes of adultery, cohabitation and marital separation; brief upper and rear female nudity and rear male nudity; alcohol use and drunkenness; smoking; and, woman tries to steal baby, woman buys baby, smuggling, illegal immigration, fencing of stolen goods, racism, man says he does not believe in God, and talk about how man abandoned his wife for his son’s ex-girlfriend 20 years ago.

Summary:

UP AND DOWN is a satirical drama from Czechoslovakia about the impact of globalization, immigration and racism on that society. The movie has a light humanist worldview with plenty of foul language, brief violence and strong sexual content in one scene.

Review:

UP AND DOWN is a satirical drama from Czechoslovakia about the impact of globalization, immigration and racism on that society. It does this by focusing on a disparate group of characters.

The story opens with two men smuggling a group of Muslims across the border. One of the women collapses after the border crossing, and her baby gets left in the truck. The smugglers discover the baby much later and sell him to a desperate woman named Mila, who’s living with Franta, an ex-con trying to leave his racist soccer buddies behind him and start a new life. Franta is disturbed, however, to find the dark-skinned baby in their apartment.

Meanwhile, Hana, a 40-year-old refugee worker, and her much older partner, Otto, a university professor with a terminal illness, invite the man’s abandoned wife and their son to discuss the professor’s will. The son, Martin, moved away to Australia when his parents split up 20 years ago and has never met his half-sister. Martin’s parents don’t know that his wife in Australia is black.

The lives of these characters converge when Martin thinks one of the smugglers has stolen his wallet, and Franta, a security guard, tries to help Martin recover it.

There’s no final resolution in this entertaining, open-ended movie, which combines social commentary with family drama. The filmmakers seem to take a humanist, but moral, view toward racism. Their view of illegal immigration is mixed, with a taste of political correctness. UP AND DOWN also contains plenty of foul language, brief violence and strong sexual content in one scene.

In Brief:

UP AND DOWN is a satirical drama from Czechoslovakia about the impact of globalization, immigration and racism on that society. The story opens with two men smuggling Muslims across the border. A baby gets accidentally left on the truck. The smugglers sell him to a desperate woman named Mila, who’s living an ex-con trying to leave his racist buddies behind him and start a new life. Meanwhile, a 40-year-old refugee worker and her much older partner, a university professor with a terminal illness, invite the man’s abandoned wife and their son to discuss the professor’s will. The son, Martin, moved away to Australia when his parents split up 20 years ago and has never met his half-sister. Martin’s Australian wife is black. The lives of these characters converge when Martin thinks one of the smugglers stole his wallet.

There is no final resolution in this entertaining, open-ended movie, which combines social commentary with family drama. The filmmakers seem to take a humanist, but moral, view toward racism. Their view has a taste of political correctness, however. UP AND DOWN contains plenty of foul language, brief violence and strong sexual content in one scene.