TO THE ARTIC 3D

Beautifully Shot but Flawed

Content -1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 20, 2012

Starring: Narrated by Meryl Streep

Genre: Documentary

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: 40 minutes

Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures/Time
Warner and IMAX Corporation

Director: Greg MacGillivray

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Greg MacGillivray, Shaun
MacGillivray

Writer: Stephen Judson

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey L. Bewkes, CEO, Time Warner
Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (New Line Cinema)
Jeff Robinov, President, Warner Bros. Pictures Group
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com
And
Greg Foster, Chairman/President, IMAX Corporation
3003 Exposition Blvd.
Santa Monica, CA 90404
Phone: (310) 255-5500; Fax: (310) 255-5501 and 315-1759
Website: www.imax.com

Content:

(Pa, B, C, EEE, V, M) Light mixed or pagan worldview with some moral and redemptive elements about a mother polar bear defending her cubs, marred by some overt environmentalist proselytizing about global warming, which seems a little out of date and may be contradicted by some recent evidence; no foul language; polar bear finds a seal and feeds it to her cubs, and their fur becomes red with the blood; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, some proselytizing.

Summary:

TO THE ARCTIC is a 40-minute IMAX documentary about the Arctic and the animals living there. The 3D IMAX photography is amazing, but the story told is a little episodic and the filmmakers use their movie to promote the global warming theory of the total destruction of the Arctic ice by 2040 or 2050. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises some caution.

Review:

TO THE ARCTIC is a 40-minute IMAX documentary about the Arctic and the animals living there. The 3D IMAX photography is amazing, but the story told is a little episodic, and the filmmakers use their movie to promote the global warming theory of the total destruction of the Arctic ice by 2040 or 2050. In reality, however, a Feb. 8, 2012 story in U.S. News and World Report said that the Arctic ice is melting 30% less than previously thought (http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2012/02/08/earths-polar-ice-melting-less-than-thought).

TO THE ARCTIC begins with some stunning 3D photography of snow falling, then of a huge ice flow in the Arctic during summertime. As usually happens during the summer, multiple waterfalls occur on the giant cliff faces of the ice flow.

To support its global warming hypothesis, the movie briefly interviews an Inuit Eskimo, a diver who explores beneath the ice flows and cavorts with walruses, and two scientists following the migration of the caribou herds. Eventually, it focuses on a polar bear mother and her two cubs as they search for food among the summer ice flows. The three polar bears also are shown fending off a male polar bear that wants to eat the cubs because he can’t find any seals to hunt.

The photography in TO THE ARCTIC is stunning. It takes a while, however, to get to the captivating story about the mother polar bear and her two cubs. Thus, the first half of TO THE ARCTIC is more like an informational documentary rather than a dramatic narrative. Though it does appear the Arctic ice is melting more, the extent and the causes are disputed by some scientists. It’s also unknown whether the melting will make our weather cooler or warmer. Warmer weather may help farmers grow more food, but cooler weather apparently kills more people.

Whatever the case, however, MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution regarding this particular nature documentary until more facts become clear.

In Brief:

TO THE ARCTIC is a 40-minute IMAX documentary about the Arctic and the animals living there. It begins with stunning 3D photography of snow falling and a huge ice flow during summertime. To support a global warming hypothesis about the Arctic ice melting, the movie interviews four people. They include an Inuit Eskimo, a diver who explores beneath the ice flows and cavorts with walruses, and two scientists following the migration of caribou herds. Eventually, the movie focuses on a polar bear mother and her two cubs as they search for food around the summer ice flows. The three polar bears also are shown fending off a male bear that wants to eat the cubs because he can’t find any seals to hunt.

The photography in TO THE ARCTIC is stunning. It takes a while, however, to get to the captivating story about the mother polar bear and her cubs. Thus, the first half of TO THE ARCTIC is more like an informational documentary. Though it does appear the Arctic ice is melting more, the extent and causes are disputed by some scientists. Therefore, MOVIEGUIDE® advises caution for TO THE ARCTIC.