NOMAD

Fighting Oppression in Central Asia

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 16, 2007

Starring: Kuno Becker, Jason Scott Lee,
Jay Hernandez, Doshkhan
Zhotzhaxynov, and Ayanet
Yesmagambetov

Genre: Historical Epic/Adventure
Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 112 minutes

Distributor: The Weinstein Co.

Director: Sergei Bodorov and Ivan Passer

Executive Producer: None

Producer: Milos Forman

Writer: Rustam Ibragimbekov

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
The Weinstein Company
345 Hudson Street, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10014
Phone: (646) 862-3400
Fax: (917) 368-7000
Website: www.weinsteinco.com

Content:

(BB, C, L, VVV, N, D, M) Strong ethical monotheistic worldview with some minor redemptive elements; one "damnation" obscenity and zero profanities; very strong violence with some blood but nothing extremely graphic includes an implied decapitation during a battle with the detached head shown from afar and the headless face in close-up, hero's face shown splattered a bit with blood one time, horses pull man apart from afar and a leg is shown being dragged, sword fighting with stabbing, arrows hit soldiers, man riding horse passes through gauntlet of arrows and other weapons while doing tremendous acrobatics to escape injury, cannons fire and explode, battle scenes, etc.; no sex scenes but brief kissing; upper male nudity but no sexual nudity; no alcohol use; older woman smokes a pipe; and, kidnapping and oppression rebuked and overcome.

Summary:

NOMAD: THE WARRIOR is a historical epic from Kazakhstan about a national hero who frees his people from Mongol oppression in the 18th Century. This movie's setting and its photography are unique and compelling, but otherwise it is fairly average, with some positive references to God and some very strong violence requiring strong caution.

Review:

NOMAD: THE WARRIOR is Kazakhstan’s entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards. It tells the story of Ablai Khan, a Kazak ruler and descendent of Genghis Khan who freed his people from Mongol oppression in the 18th Century. A holy man named Oraz hides the newborn khan from the current Mongol ruler. Oraz trains the boy until he is ready to unite the Kazak clans and defeat the Mongols. After much fighting and derring do, as well as some tragedy, he succeeds.

The setting and photography in this movie is unique and compelling. Being able to see what the steppes of Kazakhstan look like, and the areas where people live and lived is a new visual experience. Otherwise, however, this movie is fairly average. It takes a while for the story to focus on the elder Ablai. Even then, the man's character is not well developed. This is strange because the description of Ablai Khan in the history books makes him out to be a charismatic, talented leader.

There are many positive references to God in NOMAD. Although Islam was a major part of the country's culture by the time the story occurs, the movie contains no references to Mohammed or the Koran, although some of the political leaders are called "sultan." Thus, NOMAD has a strong monotheistic and ethical worldview, with some redemptive elements. And, there is only one obscenity and no sexual content. There is some very strong violence with a little blood, however, so MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution. The violence is not as strong as other similar American-made movies, like THE PATRIOT, which also received an extreme caution from MOVIEGUIDE®.

In Brief:

NOMAD: THE WARRIOR is Kazakhstan’s entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards. It tells the story of Ablai Khan, a Kazak ruler who freed his people from Mongol oppression in the 18th Century. A holy warrior named Oraz hides the newborn khan from the current Mongol ruler. Oraz trains the boy until he is ready to unite the Kazak clans and defeat the Mongols. After much fighting and derring do, as well as some tragedy, he succeeds.

This movie's setting and photography are unique and compelling. Otherwise, it is fairly average. It takes a while for the story to focus on the hero as an adult. Even then, his character is not well developed. There are many positive references to God in NOMAD. Although Islam was a major part of the country's culture by the time the story occurs, the movie contains no references to Mohammed or the Koran. Thus, NOMAD has a strong monotheistic and ethical worldview, with some redemptive elements. It also has only one obscenity and no sex. There is some very strong violence with a little blood, however, so MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.