THE LAST MIMZY

Tainted Family Sci-Fi

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 23, 2007

Starring: Rhiannon Leigh Wryn, Rainn
Wilson, Joely Richardson,
Megan McKinnon, Marc Thomas
Musso, Kirsten Williamson,
Timothy Hutton, Michael Clarke
Duncan, Kathryn Hahn, and
Chris O'Neill

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Older children to adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 94 minutes

Distributor: New Line Cinema

Director: Robert Shaye

Executive Producer: Family Sci-Fi **

Producer: Michael Phillips

Writer: James V Hart, Jim Kouf, Toby
Emmerich, Lewis Padgett, and
Bruce Joel Rubin

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne
Co-Chairman/Co-CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd.
Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 354-1824
Website: www.newline.com

Content:

(PaPa, FRFR, OO, Ev, L, M) Confused pagan worldview where the universe can speak to people through dreams and intricate drawings, and tainted by occult content where palm readings disclose genetic purity and man-made devices sent back from the future turn children into geniuses with telekinetic powers, plus a possible subtext promoting the idea of brain and mind "evolution"; one use of the “d” word, nine derogatory uses of the word for what vacuum cleaners do, one profanity of a “holy God” not intended as praise; no violence; no sex; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, respect is shown to “wisdom” to be found in Tibet but the lessons on that wisdom are not clear, no effort to seek God for guidance is apparent, and the “Mimzy” (an “intelligent” computerized stuffed rabbit made in the future by Intel) knows best.

Summary:

THE LAST MIMZY is a science fiction stew aimed at family audiences about two children finding an "artificial intelligence" from the future that improves their mental abilities and gives them special powers to save mankind. The movie is tainted by palm reading and the “wisdom” of Tibet. It fails artistically because it doesn’t make the title character very loveable.

Review:

THE LAST MIMZY is a science fiction stew aimed at family audiences. It is spiced with a workaholic father, a boy who uses science to instantly excel at golf, spiders creating amazing webs, a government agency bursting in to round up children, and a stuffed bunny that will "die" if not sent back to the future quickly. Regrettably, it also throws in palm reading and the “wisdom” of Tibet. It's as if someone undercooked a soup with 50 different vegetables in it.

The movie opens with a desperate scientist somewhere in the future sending “the last mimzy” back in time with the hope it will return with the pure genetic code necessary to save human life. The Mimzy (a stuffed bunny rabbit with futuristic Intel chips inside) is found in a time capsule by a little girl, Emma (Rhiannon Leigh Wryn), and her brother, Jo (Joely Richardson), while spending time at the family’s vacation home. With the help of the contents of the Mimzy’s time capsule, Jo goes from C- student to scientific genius.

Sadly, the movie veers from its science fiction roots and ventures into mysticism. After playing with the objects in Mimzy’s time capsule, Jo is inspired to draw mystic carpet patterns that exactly match drawings of the universe done by Tibetan monks centuries before. Palm readings of Emma’s hand reveal her to contain a remarkably pure genetic code – just what Mimzy was sent back in time to locate. Like in ET, the screenwriters imply that Mimzy is dying and needs to get home quickly, but, unlike ET, they fail to develop Mimzy into a character about whom you care. Mimzy comes across as a lifeless stuffed animal that hums.

It is not as if the makers of THE LAST MIMZY are out to get elementary schoolchildren into palm reading and Tibetan mysticism. It appears these are just plot devices to heighten the movie's sense of mystery. To most people, palm reading and strange drawings from Tibet are mysterious, but Christians are strongly warned in the Bible against activities like palm reading. Furthermore, the answers to the mysteries of the universe do not come from Tibet but from the Word of God: the Bible. Thus, it is easier not to take little children to THE LAST MIMZY than it is to explain to them the dangers of mysticism and palm reading.

When making “family” movies, it would be wise to consider what elements in your script may offend large numbers of the people you hope will buy tickets. While little children may not be offended by palm reading, their parents are the ones who buy the tickets. There is a much larger Christian audience out there than there is an audience of mystics.

THE LAST MIMZY contains one use of the "d" word and nine references to what a vacuum cleaner does. There is no sex, violence or nudity. This could have been a good family movie without the mysticism and if the scriptwriters could have managed to make Mimzy more lovable.

In Brief:

THE LAST MIMZY is a science fiction stew including a workaholic dad, a boy who uses science to excel at golf, spiders creating amazing webs, a government agency rounding up the children, and a stuffed, artificially intelligent bunny that will "die" if not sent back to the future quickly with a sample of a perfect genetic code. Sadly, the movie also throws in palm reading and the “wisdom” of Tibet. It's as if someone undercooked a soup with 50 different vegetables in it.

It is not as if the makers of THE LAST MIMZY are out to seduce schoolchildren into palm reading and mysticism. These appear to be just plot devices to heighten the sense of mystery. To most people, palm reading and strange drawings from Tibet are mysterious, but Christians are strongly warned in the Bible against activities like palm reading. Of course, the answers to the mysteries of the universe do not come from Tibet but from the Word of God: the Bible. It’s easier not to take little children to THE LAST MIMZY than it is to explain to them the dangers of mysticism and palm reading.