CEDAR COVE: EPISODES ONE THROUGH THREE Add To My Top 10

A Great Place To Live

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 20, 2013

Address Comments To:

Bill Abbott, President/CEO, Crown Media Holdings
Elizabeth Yost, Vice President of Development, The Hallmark Channel
12700 Ventura Boulevard
Studio City, CA 91604
Phone: (818) 755-2400; Website: www.hallmarkchannel.com

Content:

(BB, CapCap L, V, S, M) Strong moral worldview in first three episodes with some strong free-market, small town American values; four obscenities and one light profanity in first three episodes; minor violence with a car crash, a man bleeding, and threat of violence, plus two people die off screen; lots of romance with brief kissing, some cutaways from situations that might develop into more than just romance, light hint of married man falling in love with another woman; no nudity; no explicit alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, lying, blackmail, mob rule, stealing, but all rebuked and eventually shown to be wrong.

Summary:

The Hallmark TV series CEDAR COVE revolves around Olivia, a local judge with a budding relationship with a reporter who must come up with creative solutions for the town’s problems. CEDAR COVE is a beautiful, well-written program and comes up with moral solutions to the town’s problems, but there are some obscenities and adult situations.

Review:

CEDAR COVE is an absolutely beautiful, well-written, well-directed, female-oriented television series on the Hallmark Channel. It’s a typical television program with standard plot problems that end up with moral solutions. Movieguide® got to watch three episodes.



The first, called “House Divided,” is propelled by the plot problem of a developer in the small town of Cedar Cove who hasn’t been able to sell his property. Now, he wants to tear down the lighthouse on the property. The citizens are up in arms. Olivia, the local judge played by Andie McDowell, is caught between the will of the citizens, especially her mother who says her father proposed to her in the lighthouse, and doing the right thing. Complicating matters is the local newspaper owner with whom she’s developing a relationship, who’s on the side of depriving Warren of his property rights. She makes the tough, but right, decision, that it’s his property, and then comes up with a plan to solve the problem and save the lighthouse. Meanwhile, her daughter broke up with Warren and has taken up with an industrial fisherman. Her best friend, Grace, was served divorce papers. Grace’s daughter is trying to run the local art gallery. Many personal relationships, subplots, and plots are interwoven.



This is a well-produced television series. The acting is wonderful. And, the series is emblematic of the excellence Hallmark is known for in its productions. The problems in the small town are problems that confront everyday people. There are some references to things like yoga, but it was followed by, “I’m sick of my inner child.” Did I say Olivia’s solution to the plot problem reminds one of the classic Christian story about the judge who has to find his son guilty and then goes in front of the bench and pays the fine, referring of course to the fact that God is both judge and savior.



In the next episode, “Reunion,” Bob, the newspaper editor, and Olivia are getting along in their relationship when Bob’s son, whom he hasn’t seen for many years, shows up at the doorstep. It’s clear that Eric, Bob’s son, is angry, resentful, and seething for revenge. Evidently, Bob was an alcoholic and a lousy father and abandoned Eric and his mother in Philadelphia. Grace sees Eric steal from Bob’s money box. This plot problem can only be resolved by Bob asking for forgiveness.



The third episode, “Suspicious Minds,” revolves around the bed and breakfast where, in the middle of the night, a bleeding man shows up at the doorstep, takes a room, and then is found dead the next day. The question of who done it is complicated by the fact this is a small town where people love to gossip and all the personal relationships and suspicions come to a head.



Hallmark is clearly proud of CEDAR COVE. Movieguide®’s only concerns are that they insert a small amount of obscenities and that some of the adult situations almost cross the line between romance and lust. If this was a movie, they’d call it a “chick flick.” CEDAR COVE is clearly aimed at women, who make up the majority of the Hallmark audience. The good news is that, underneath all the relationships, there’s always a moral perspective, and some very light redemptive elements. Also, the series is clearly free market oriented and comes down on the side of traditional biblical values.

In Brief:

CEDAR COVE is an absolutely beautiful, well-written, well-directed, female-oriented television series on the Hallmark Channel. It is a typical television program with standard plot problems that end up with moral solutions. Movieguide® reviewed the first three episodes. The story revolves around Olivia, a local judge who has a budding relationship with a reporter and who must come up with creative solutions for the town’s problems. Relationships get messy and some of the cases get difficult, but Olivia comes up with the right answers.



Hallmark is clearly proud of CEDAR COVE. Movieguide®’s only concerns are that they do insert a small amount of obscenities and that some of the adult situations almost cross the line between romance and lust. If this was a movie, it would be called a “chick flick.” It’s clearly aimed at women, who make up the majority of the Hallmark audience. The good news is that, underneath all the relationships, there’s always a moral perspective, and some very light redemptive elements. Finally, CEDAR COVE is clearly free market oriented and comes down on the side of traditional biblical values