DINNER RUSH

A Light Confection

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 14, 2001

Starring: Danny Aiello, Edoardo
Ballerni, Vivian Wu, Mike
McGlone, Kirk Acevedo, John
Corbett, Sandra Bernhard,
Summer Phoenix, & Polly Draper

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Access Motion Picture Group,
Inc./Entertainment Capital
Group plc

Director: Bob Giraldi

Executive Producer: Phil Suarez

Producer: Bob Giraldi, Louis DiGiaimo &
Patti Greaney

Writer: Rick Shaugnessy & Brian S.
Kalata

Address Comments To:

Rom Ricciardi, CEO
Entertainment Capital Group plc
Website: www.entertainmentcapital.com
Email: contact@entertainmentcapital.com

Content:

(RoRo, PaPa, Ho, LLL, VV, SS, A, D, M) Romantic worldview with some pagan elements & brief homosexual references; 76 obscenities including many “f” words, 3 strong profanities regarding Jesus, 2 mild profanities, & men use urinals; strong violence includes three gangster murders with guns & threats of violence, but nothing extremely graphic; depicted fornication with clothes on; no nudity; alcohol use; smoking; and, miscellaneous immorality, such as gambling, being a gambling bookieplace.

Summary:

Danny Aiello stars in DINNER RUSH as the owner of a restaurant and small-time gambling operation in New York City who undergoes conflict with his master chef son and two gangsters. DINNER RUSH is a very entertaining, often comical, mix of characters and situations, but it contains plenty of foul language, a Romantic worldview, a sex scene, some violence, and a revenge motif.

Review:

Danny Aiello stars in DINNER RUSH, a dark comedy that mixes gangsters, the restaurant business and a wry sense of humor. Aiello plays Lou Cropa, the owner of an Italian restaurant in New York City who earns money on the side as a gambling bookie. When two Italian hoods from Queens try to take over the business, Lou advises his partner, Enrico, to let them have the bookie business, because they no longer need it. Enrico refuses, and they murder him while he’s walking his granddaughter.

Meanwhile, Lou’s son Udo, who’s the master nouveau chef at Lou’s restaurant, pesters his father about letting him have complete control of the restaurant. Lou doesn’t like the fact that his son has little respect for the traditions that make Italian cooking so popular, but he can see that his son is a very talented cook who’s bringing a lot of business into the restaurant. Unhappily for Lou, his favorite old-style Italian chef, a young man named Duncan, owes the two mobsters from Queens a hefty gambling debt. Moreover, he’s about to make another big bet with them to get out of debt, against Lou’s wishes. As the crowd shuffles into the restaurant for another night of wondrous dining, the two hoods from Queens also arrive to put the muscle on both Lou and Duncan.

DINNER RUSH is a very entertaining mix of characters and situations. It will make you leave the theater hungry for some Italian cuisine. The gangster plot is woven nicely into the stories about the restaurant business and about serving that evening’s customers, which include an annoying art gallery owner and a snotty food critic. As usual, Danny Aiello is marvelous as the patriarch. He exudes both confidence and warmth. Kirk Acevedo as Duncan and Edoardo Ballerini as Udo are also excellent as is Mark Margolis as the art gallery owner, Summer Phoenix as the smart, conscientious waitress who serves him and John Corbett as a Wall Street type who hangs out at the bar. This is a credit to both the director and the writers who worked on the script.

Despite the panache with which it’s put together, DINNER RUSH remains a light Italian dessert rather than a meaty banquet. It also has a romantic worldview and a strong pagan theme of revenge. Although he shows a moral concern for other people, Lou must wreak his revenge for the death of his partner, Enrico. There is also some violence and a sex scene in the movie where Duncan has a dalliance with the head waitress, Nicole, who has been involved with Udo but really loves Duncan, if only he could stop his gambling addiction. In the end, it’s up to Lou to make sure that everybody gets what they deserve. In that respect, he’s like a Mafia Godfather, the pseudo deity who hands out rewards and punishments to those inside and outside his “family.”

In Brief:

Danny Aiello stars in DINNER RUSH, a dark comedy that mixes gangsters, the restaurant business and a wry sense of humor. Aiello plays Lou Cropa, the owner of an Italian restaurant in New York City who earns money on the side as a gambling bookie. Two hoods from Queens kill his partner and demand that he turn over both his gambling business and his restaurant. They also put the squeeze on one of his favorite chefs, who owes them a hefty gambling debt. Meanwhile, Lou’s master chef son, is pestering Dad to give him the family restaurant business. Lou makes a series of important decisions that affects the lives of everybody.

DINNER RUSH is a very entertaining mix of characters and situations. It will make the audience leave the theater hungry for some Italian cuisine. The acting is very good, especially Danny Aiello as Lou. Despite the panache with which it’s put together, DINNER RUSH remains a light Italian dessert rather than a meaty banquet. It also has a romantic worldview and a strong pagan theme of revenge. There is also plenty of strong foul language, some violence and a sex scene.