REBOUND Add To My Top 10

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Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 01, 2005

Starring: Martin Lawrence, Wendy Raquel Robinson, Breckin Meyer, Horatio Sanz, and Alia Shawkat

Genre: Sports Comedy

Audience: Children to young teenagers

Rating: PG for mild language and
thematic elements

Runtime: 93 minutes

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch
Chairman/CEO
News Corp.
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(B, L, V, M) Light moral worldview with warm, fuzzy life lessons; two light obscenities and four light profanities like “Oh my God!”, plus some light bathroom humor, including nervous boy throws up before games; slapstick violence includes coach attacking mascot, people hit with basketballs and girl punches boy off-screen; no sex, nudity, alcohol, or smoking; and, team prayer includes a request for other team to injure themselves.

Summary:

REBOUND is about a college basketball coach who takes over a middle school team to show the public that he’s a nice guy. REBOUND is cheaply made but produces a few laughs and is fairly clean of objectionable elements, with only a few utterances of “Oh my God!” and two light obscenities.

Review:

REBOUND is about a college basketball coach who is fired because of his angry sideline antics. To regain his job, he offers to coach a middle school basketball team so that his former bosses will see that he’s actually a nice guy. At first, his new job is just a publicity stunt, but after the team loses by 100 points, he has to roll up his sleeves and begin coaching them in earnest so that he’s not embarrassed.

Martin Lawrence plays the disgraced coach. Once the team begins winning and taking pride in their work, they start to get along with the coach and develop affection for each other. By the end of the season, their team is the best in the league and they’re headed for the playoffs. On the day of the championship game, Coach Ray has to decide between heading back to his college team or sticking with the middle schoolers.

REBOUND is cheaply made – the boom falls into the frame about ten times – but due to some good secondary casting, like Megan Mullally and Horatio Sans, it produces a few laughs. Children, who are the target audience, may relate to the jokes about the shy boy who learns to flirt and the nervous player who throws up before each game.

As in many sports movies, the children learn bravery, the value of hard work, sportsmanship, and some other generic but positive morals. The coach, meanwhile, learns that relationships are more valuable than fame or money.

REBOUND is clean, with only a few utterances of “Oh my God!” and two barely noticeable uses of the “d” word. There is no problematic sexual discussion or scenes to make parents cringe.

If they haven’t already seen the bad team-turns-good formula a few times, children might enjoy REBOUND. Otherwise, it’s a somewhat slow and tedious game.

In Brief:

REBOUND is about a college basketball coach who is fired because of his angry sideline antics. To regain his job, he offers to coach a middle school basketball team so that his former bosses will see that he’s a nice guy. At first his new job is a publicity stunt, but, after the team loses by 100 points, he rolls up his sleeves and begins coaching them in earnest. By the end of the season, Coach Ray has to decide between heading back to his college team or sticking with the middle schoolers. Martin Lawrence plays the disgraced coach.

REBOUND is cheaply made but produces a few laughs. Children may relate to the shy boy who learns to flirt and the nervous player who gets sick before each game. As in many sports movies, the team learns bravery, the value of hard work, sportsmanship, and other positive morals. REBOUND is fairly clean, with only a few utterances of “Oh my God!” and two light obscenities. There are no scenes to make parents cringe. If they haven’t already seen the bad team-turns-good formula a few times, children might enjoy REBOUND. Otherwise, it’s a slow game.