THE UNDERNEATH

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 28, 1995

Starring: Peter Gallagher, Joe Don Baker & Alison Elliot

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 Minutes

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Content:

(H, LL, V, S, NN, A, D, M) Humanist worldview -- man makes his own breaks & therefore must seize all he can; 10 obscenities, 4 profanities & 1 vulgarity; 2 bloodless murders & 1 bloodless robbery where two men get shot & one later dies; implied fornication & brief sexual innuendo; brief rear male & female nudity -- 1 instance in non-sexual context, 2 instances in sexual context though not graphically depicted; frequent use of alcohol & smoking; and, one man is shown as a compulsive gambler.

Summary:

THE UNDERNEATH is a frightening tale of double and triple-crossing thieves. The film glorifies the ability of man to make his own breaks by justifying the means with the end result. Though the subject matter was morbid and the action slow, the script was well written and acted, and the lack of obscenities used in common conversation was a refreshing change.

Review:

THE UNDERNEATH is a frightening tale of double and triple-crossing thieves. Michael Chambers (Peter Gallagher) is the prodigal son who left home for undetermined reasons. Michael returns home for his mother's marriage to Ed, a really nice guy who works for an armored car company. Mike applies for a job at his step-dad's place of employment, and we learn that Mike has planned the heist of the decade. Meanwhile, Mike starts to rekindle an unsalvageable relationship with Rachel, who happens to be dating Tommy, an extremely jealous egomaniac. Mike's older brother is a cop on the take who threatens Rachel with jail if she ever looks at Mike again. When the time for the heist arrives, Ed gets caught in the crossfire and dies, and Mike gets severely injured. While in the hospital, Mike is kidnapped and taken deep into the woods to a cabin where he meets Tommy and Rachel. Tommy shoots the kidnapper, Mike (in his wheelchair) shoots Tommy, and Rachel frames Mike for the entire crime. The last scene: Mike's boss finalizing the whole nefarious deal.

THE UNDERNEATH is a film that glorifies the ability of man to make his own breaks by justifying the means with the end result. Though the subject matter was morbid and the action slow, the script was well written and acted. Furthermore, the lack of obscenities used in common conversation was a refreshing change.

In Brief: