2 DAYS IN THE VALLEY

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 27, 1996

Starring: James Spader, Eric Stoltz,
Danny Aiello, Paul Mazursky,
Jeff Daniels, Keith Carradine,
Teri Hatcher, Paul Rodriguez,
& Cheryl Ladd

Genre:

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: MGM/UA

Director: John Herzfeld

Executive Producer:

Producer: Jeff Wald & Herb Nanas

Writer: John Herzfeld

Address Comments To:

Content:

(Pa, LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN, DD, M) Pagan worldview of crime & justice; 72 obscenities & 7 profanities; extensive violence including explosions, cruel threats of murder, implied gunshot murder with images of bloody corpse, man shot in leg, woman shot in side, shoot-outs, point-blank murder, pictures of bloody nude corpse, attempted suicide, & man knocks other man out; woman offers sexual favors to man in massage parlor, woman in foreplay with man, attempted rape, graphic fornication scene, & sexual talk; upper female nudity, upper male nudity, paintings of nude women, man & woman in underwear, & visible erection seen as towel drapes across a man's midsection; smoking & implied drug use; and, miscellaneous immorality including kidnapping, breaking-and-entering, & car theft

GENRE: Thriller

Summary:

2 DAYS IN THE VALLEY is a low-key PULP FICTION-like thriller involving murder, hit-men, illicit sex, situation comedy, and intertwining characters. Having unpredictable plot twists, it is a very foul sex and violence thriller.

Review:

2 DAYS IN THE VALLEY is a low-key, PULP FICTION-like thriller involving murder, hit-men, illicit sex, situation comedy, and intertwining characters. A cinematic jigsaw puzzle, it is a brutal movie with the teasing attraction of a good plot. Featuring an all B-level star cast, the movie starts out with James Spader and Danny Aiello playing two hit men who break into a house, drug a woman and kill her ex-husband. Spader takes Aiello to a remote spot, shoots him in the chest and explodes the car. Spader doesn't know, however, that Aiello was wearing a bullet-proof vest and escaped from the car before it exploded. Before it is all over, the police get on the case, and Aiello takes hostages. The police also go to the crime scene where they meet Spader for a fatal encounter. Soon, all of the characters interact in a situation that will irrevocably alter each other's lives.

Morally, this movie is reprehensible. Not only are there gruesome wicked killers, but we see rambunctious sex. Furthermore, we see kidnapping, car theft, lying, attempted murder, and many uses of obscenities. Clearly, this movie is drawing heavily from PULP FICTION. All of this could and should keep away moral Americans. Critically praised, it will indicate whether Americans favor good morals (which they won't find at all here) or a good plot

In Brief: