27 DRESSES

A Chick-Flick Gem with a Few Flaws

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 11, 2008

Starring: Katherine Heigl, James
Marsdon, Malin Akerman,
Edwards Burns, Melora Hardin,
and Judy Greer

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 107 minutes

Distributor: 20th Century Fox

Director: Anne Fletcher

Executive Producer: Becki Cross Trujillo

Producer: Gary Barber, Roger Bimbaum and
Jonathan Glickman

Writer: Aline Brosh McKenna

Address Comments To:

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman/CEO of News Corp.
Peter Chernin, President/COO of The Fox Group
Tom Rothman and Jim Gianopulos, Chairmen/CEO
Fox Filmed Entertainment
20th Century Fox Film Corp.
10201 West Pico Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90035
Phone: (310) 369-1000
Website: www.fox.com

Content:

(Ro, B, C, LL, S, AA, M) Light Romantic worldview with featured character being “good” where protagonist main character begins movie remarkably unselfish being ultra helpful at work and with 27 brides for whom she served as a helpful bridesmaid; People give her a hard time about being too much of a servant and she jokes, “I’m Jesus” (the comment implies that she has a servant’s heart, like Jesus), but throughout the movie she is encouraged to be more selfish; 10 obscenities and one questionable use of the name Jesus (see above); no violence; one scene of rowdy drunken behavior leading to implied fornication which is regretted the next morning; several scenes of dressing and undressing with little more than shoulders and legs shown; alcohol use and drunkenness; no smoking; and, some dishonesty condemned and punished.

Summary:

27 DRESSES is a very clever perpetual-bridesmaid chick-flick, loaded with drama and humor, but tainted by some bad language and behavior that could easily have been left out. Regrettably, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution because of the movie’s few unacceptable elements.

Review:

27 DRESSES is a very clever perpetual-bridesmaid chick-flick, loaded with drama and humor, tainted by some bad language and behavior that could easily have been left out. MOVIEGUIDE® regrets having to call for extreme caution because of a few unacceptable elements. 27 DRESSES is not like KNOCKED UP and some of the other ultra-vulgar comedies of 2007.

The movie stars Katherine Heigl as Jane, a highly efficient career woman who loves the role of bridesmaid and practically works as a free wedding planner. She has 27 bridesmaid’s dresses, the last two being for weddings held the same evening. She taxies back and forth between the weddings several times, changing dresses in the cab.

At work, Jane’s an ideal executive assistant. She knows what her boss George (Edward Burns) wants before he even asks. Sadly, she’s treated like a trusted housekeeper, even though she’s in love with her boss and dreams of him falling in love with her. Her pain is multiplied when her sister Tess, a model, comes to visit and her boss falls for her sister. Jane’s friends encourage her to be more selfish and less of a servant. At one point she jokes, “I’m Jesus.” While this is clearly an improper use of the name of Jesus, the implication, in context, was that she enjoyed serving others, not that she was holy.

While on the wedding circuit, Jane meets Kevin (played by James Marsden, Prince Charming in ENCHANTED). Kevin is a smooth talking, smooth writing society page writer who covers glamorous weddings. Rejected several times by Jane, he finds a way to push himself into her life. Jane reaches a breaking point when George proposes to her younger sister, and Kevin writes an article for the Sunday paper about the 27-time bridesmaid.

There’s ample humor in 27 DRESSES. The script and acting are good enough that viewers will feel Jane’s pain acutely. In a few instances, the humor is vulgar and one scene requires a couple to get roaring drunk and have sex outside of marriage. Happily, the movie makes it clear that the drinking and sex were wrong behavior and that the behavior was regretted. Regrettably, however, the movie tends to side with the heroine becoming more selfish.

The movie’s flaws are not pervasive. With some judicious modifications, the movie could have been good clean fun for a much larger audience. A good comedy writer can get laughs without resorting to vulgarity and immorality. Hopefully, Hollywood will learn this lesson and make more wholesome and profitable movies.

In Brief:

27 DRESSES is a very clever perpetual-bridesmaid chick-flick, loaded with drama and humor, but tainted by some bad language and behavior. Katherine Heigl plays Jane, a highly efficient career woman who loves the role of bridesmaid and practically works as a free wedding planner. She has 27 bridesmaid’s dresses. At work, she’s an ideal executive assistant. Sadly, she’s treated like a trusted housekeeper, even though she’s in love with her boss and dreams of him falling in love with her. Her pain is multiplied when her sister Tess, a model, visits and her boss falls for her sister. Jane meets Kevin, a smooth talking, smooth writing society page writer who covers weddings. She reaches a breaking point when George proposes to her sister, and Kevin publishes a story about the 27-time bridesmaid.

In a few instances, the humor in 27 DRESSES is vulgar and one scene requires a couple to get roaring drunk and have sex outside of marriage. Happily, it is made clear that the drinking and sex were wrong behavior and the behavior was regretted. Regrettably, however, the movie tends to side with the heroine becoming more selfish.