BROKEN ENGLISH

Broken People, Broken Relationships

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 02, 1997

Starring: Parker Posey, Drea de Matteo,
Melvil Poupaud, Josh Hamilton,
Tim Guinee, Griffin Dunne, and
Justin Theroux

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 98 Minutes

Distributor: Magnolia Pictures and HDNet
Films

Director: Zoe R. Cassavetes

Executive Producer: Mark Cuban and Todd Wagner

Producer: Andrew Fierberg, David Atlan
Jackson and Joana Vicente

Writer: Zoe R. Cassavetes

Address Comments To:

Bill Banowski, CEO
Magnolia Pictures
1614 West 5th St.
Austin, TX 78703
Eamon Bowles, President
Magnolia Pictures
43 West 27th St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 924-6701
Fax: (212) 924-6742
Website: www.magpictures.com
Email: info@ magpictures.com

Content:

(RoRoRo, PCPCPC, FR, Pa, O, C, L, VV, SS, NN, AAA, DD, M) Very strong Romantic worldview that promotes emotion over reason as well as Hollywood’s politically correct definition of “love” being the height of the human experience with a very negative politically correct view of marriage as being simply “a contract,” some false religion as women practice yoga, woman meditates with chant music in the background and an occult element as a woman visits a psychic, although she later cries, “I went to a witch doctor,” and one scene where a woman visits a Catholic church and lights a candle in prayer; four obscenities (including two “f” words) and a light profanities; no violence; strong sexual content includes a lot of sexual dialogue, some married kissing, a lot of unmarried kissing, several scenes of implied fornication and couple bathes together; upper male nudity in several scenes, man seen in his underwear, woman in see-through nightgown, and brief upper female nudity in the bathtub; extremely strong alcohol use in nearly every scene of the movie as well as several scenes of drunkenness; several characters smoke cigarettes throughout the movie, one scene of marijuana use and two female characters take prescription medicines for depression; and, some miscellaneous immorality.

Summary:

Set in New York, BROKEN ENGLISH tells the story of Nora, a woman in her later thirties who finds a sex partner in an enchanting Frenchman. BROKEN ENGLISH is a formulaic, unexciting movie with a not-so-subtle, abhorrent attack on the institution of marriage.

Review:

Set in New York, BROKEN ENGLISH tells the story of Nora, played by Parker Posey, as a woman in her later thirties who is still looking for that elusive “love of her life.” Driven from one broken relationship to another, stuck in a miserable job and watching her best friend’s perfect marriage fall to pieces, Nora soon meets Julian, played by Melvil Poupaud, a Frenchman who opens her eyes to true love.

The story is as simple and formulaic as that. No plot twists in this movie, but twisted morals abound. For instance, the “true love” that Julian offers Nora is a life of guilt-free fornication in which, as Julian puts it, “We have no contract; we are just meeting each other.” Somehow, Nora finds a new stasis and inner-peace in Julian’s words compared to all the other men with whom she has had no-contract-fornication. Perhaps it is Julian’s French dialect that gives Nora the sense that, one way or another, this trans-Atlantic tryst will make her life different.

The philosophical content of this movie is abhorrent. The mass media’s continued not-so-subtle attack on the biblical institution of marriage is all too apparent in BROKEN ENGLISH. Nora’s best friend, played by Drea de Matteo, is in a perceived “perfect marriage” that is actually a miserable front. Then, as Nora confides to a sage-like woman that to be married would maybe make her feel loved, the sage responds with, “Marriage is a contract. To feel love is something else entirely.”

Perhaps if our post-modern culture quit trying to squeeze marriage within the context of romance and, instead, followed a Biblical worldview of romance within the context of marriage, then our society would have happier, healthier people – unlike Nora, who must keep herself loaded with alcohol and anti-depressants to mask her spiritual brokenness.

Filled with strong sexual content, disastrous ideologies of romanticized immorality, chemical dependency, and a few brief references to false religion and occultism, BROKEN ENGLISH is an abhorrent movie that MOVIEGUIDE® cautions all people of faith and values to avoid.

In Brief:

Set in New York, BROKEN ENGLISH tells the story of Nora, played by Parker Posey, as a woman in her thirties who is looking for that elusive “love of her life.” Driven from one broken relationship to another, stuck in a miserable job and watching her best friend’s perfect marriage fall to pieces, Nora meets Julian, a Frenchman who opens her eyes to true love. The “true love” that Julian offers Nora is a life of guilt-free fornication. As Julian puts it, “We have no contract; we are just meeting each other.”

The philosophical content in BROKEN ENGLISH is abhorrent. The mass media’s continued not-so-subtle attack on the biblical institution of marriage is all too apparent in BROKEN ENGLISH. Nora’s best friend is in a perceived “perfect marriage” that is actually a miserable front. When Nora confides to a sage-like woman that to be married would maybe make her feel loved, the sage responds with, “Marriage is a contract. To feel love is something else entirely.” With strong sexual content, disastrous romanticized immorality, chemical dependency, and brief references to false religion and occultism, BROKEN ENGLISH is not recommended.