JASON'S LYRIC

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: September 30, 1994

Starring: Allen Payne, Jada Pinkett,
Forest Whitaker, Bokeem
Woodbine, Suzzanne Douglas,
Treach, Eddie Griffin, Lahmard
Tate, & Lisa Carson

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: R (originally NC-17)

Runtime: 119 minutes

Distributor: Gramercy Pictures

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Bobby Smith, Jr.

Address Comments To:

Content:

(LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN, A, D, C, M) Judeo-Christian environment, but no discernible worldview is promoted; over 150 obscenities (including song lyrics) & 10 profanities; several beatings & multiple murders; highly graphic fornication, actual intercourse vividly depicted (most body parts shown), frequent sexual innuendo, & references to body parts & sex acts; alcoholism portrayed; drug abuse; church attendance briefly mentioned; and, revenge portrayed.

Summary:

JASON'S LYRIC examines romance, a la ROMEO AND JULIET, and the differences between two opposite brothers against the backdrop of a Houston ghetto. Although arguably entertaining, this movie depicts graphic violence, substance abuse, cold-blooded murder, an overwhelming quantity of foul language, and graphic sexual immorality, ultimately portraying a cruel world in very cruel terms.

Review:

Almost a ghetto-version of ROMEO AND JULIET, JASON'S LYRIC aims to take the viewer on a romantic escapade through the trash-filled streets of a Houston ghetto. The names are changed to Jason and Lyric, and hero Jason is a hard-working young man who wants to do right. His childhood starts with a great beginning, as he and his younger brother have a loving and caring mother and father. However, his life digresses when his alcoholic father, long divorced from their mother, is accidentally killed by his brother in a drunken disturbance. Years later, with his brother in and out of prison and Jason involved in a sexually immoral relationship, Jason finds himself still longing for a life void of the crime, murder and drugs found in such abundance in the ghetto. In the end, Lyric and Jason's lives intersect in an area separate from their romance. Their brothers, involved in crime and murder together, kill each other after their plans turn sour. This twist leads to suspense and unravels many surprises as Jason's life comes together and falls apart all at once.

Although JASON'S LYRIC is well made and could arguably be called entertaining, the romance element is overshadowed by graphic violence, substance abuse, cold-blooded murder, graphic sexual immorality, and an overwhelming quantity of foul language, ultimately portraying a cruel world in very cruel terms.

In Brief: