MORVERN CALLAR Add To My Top 10

Content -4
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 20, 2002

Starring: Samantha Morton, and Kathleen McDermott

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults REVIEWER: Dr. Tom
Snyder Webster's Dictionary
defines insipid as "devoid of
qualities that make for spirit
or character." That is an
excellent description of the
empty-headed female
protagonist in MORVERN CALLAR,
a movie from Scotland made
with government money. In
fact, it's a great description
of practically the whole movie
itself. Samantha Morton of
MINORITY REPORT plays the
title character, a 21-year-old
grocery clerk who discovers
her boyfriend has committed
suicide on Christmas Eve. The
boyfriend's death gives
Morvern a new lease on life.
The boyfriend left a note on
his computer giving her all of
his money in the bank and
instructing her to send his
novel out to various
publishers. He also leaves her
a taped collection of music to
help her remember him. Morvern
sends out the finished
manuscript under her own name
and uses part of the money to
pay for a trip to sunny Spain
for both her and her friend at
work, Lanna. Before they
leave, Morvern cuts up her
boyfriend's body and buries it
in the Scottish highlands. In
Spain, Morvern seems vacantly
cut off from both Lanna and
the world. After both she and
Lanna have one night stands
with two young men, the two
women separate. Morvern
explores the wilds of Spain
for a little bit, then ends
back in another hotel. At the
hotel, two representatives
from a publishing company
visit her and offer her
100,000 pounds for the novel
she didn't really write. The
snobbish publishing people
turn out to be as vacant as
Morvern, who returns to
Scotland to claim her
money. Samantha Morton plays
Morvern as an island all unto
herself. The woman clearly
does not feel bound by
society's rules, but she also
seems thoroughly cut off from
any meaningful contact with
other people. In fact, several
scenes show that her character
is more fascinated by the ugly
underbelly of nature,
represented by worms and bugs
crawling amid vegetation, mud,
dirt, grocery produce, and
streams. Secular critics have
naturally responded favorably
to the humanist worldview that
seems the focus of this movie,
which is based on a 1995 novel
by Alan Warner. Although there
are scenes in the movie where
Morvern is surrounded by
Christian symbols, such as
crosses and statues of Jesus
Christ, neither Morvern,
director Lynne Ramsay or the
critics take any particular
notice of them. They're just
part of the landscape,
especially when Morvern goes
to Spain. Furthermore, even
though the humanist worldview
of the movie implies that
Morvern is trying to escape
from her drab working class
existence, nothing much more
is made of this socialist
conceit. Thus, MORVERN CALLAR
the movie is just as vacant,
boring and aimless as its
protagonist. It is an empty
vessel that shows no real,
lasting passion for anything
but its own artistic
pretensions. Ironically, the
only passion that appears to
occupy the movie is its
satirical view of the
publishing people who visit
Morvern to buy the rights to
her novel. The movie shows
that these people are
clueless. The same might be
said, however, of the
snobbish, brainless attitude
that those who write books and
make movies like MORVERN
CALLAR - and the people who
wax so eloquently about such
phony "masterpieces" -
represent. These kinds of art
works are meant to be
appreciated only by an elite
few, a secret, avant-garde
cabal of Gnostics who enjoy
lording it over the rest of
humanity. No one of any real
taste (or any real common
sense, for that matter) would
ever want to sit through
something resembling MORVERN
CALLAR. That's why
self-indulgent movies like
MORVERN CALLAR make almost no
money, and seldom survive, but
movies like THE LORD OF THE
RINGS trilogy make lots of
money and are beloved by
millions. MORVERN CALLAR
contains some strong foul
language, gruesome scenes,
brief full male nudity, and
scenes of sexual immorality.
Its relative abhorrence lies
more in its insipid worldview,
insipid protagonist and
insipid aesthetics, however.
MOVIEGUIDEĀ® thinks most
viewers will want to avoid
such empty vessels. Please
address your comments to: John
Vanco & Noah
Cowen Co-Presidents Cowboy
Pictures Cowboy Booking
International 13 Laight
Street, 6th Floor New York, NY
10013 Phone: (212)
925-7800 Fax: (212)
965-5655 Email:
info@cowboybi.com Website:
www.cowboybi.com

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 97 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(HH, C, So, Pa, LL, VV, SS, NNN, A, DD, MM) Humanist worldview; some Christian symbols in the background of some scenes when protagonist visits Christian communities in Spain and implied socialist elements about the allegedly drab lifestyle of the working class as well as Hindu taxi driver in one short sequence; 22 "f" words, two light obscenities, zero profanities, and woman says she has to urinate; some lightly gruesome scenes with body of suicide victim shown with slashed wrists, implied cutting up of body with some blood spatters, blood on kitchen floor; depicted fornication, implied menage-a-trois and women take bath together (but no homosexual activity); rear male and female nudity in several scenes and brief full male nudity; alcohol use; smoking and implied drug use; and, lying, fraud and protagonist has little or no moral conscience.

GENRE: Drama

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Summary:

MORVERN CALLAR is a Scottish movie about an aimless 21-year-old woman who commits brazen, disgusting acts while she vacantly tries to escape the boundaries of the society and the people around her. MORVERN CALLAR is an abhorrent movie, dramatically, philosophically, psychologically, morally, spiritually, and artistically.

Review:

Webster's Dictionary defines insipid as "devoid of qualities that make for spirit or character." That is an excellent description of the empty-headed female protagonist in MORVERN CALLAR, a movie from Scotland made with government money. In fact, it's a great description of practically the whole movie itself.

Samantha Morton of MINORITY REPORT plays the title character, a 21-year-old grocery clerk who discovers her boyfriend has committed suicide on Christmas Eve. The boyfriend's death gives Morvern a new lease on life. The boyfriend left a note on his computer giving her all of his money in the bank and instructing her to send his novel out to various publishers. He also leaves her a taped collection of music to help her remember him.

Morvern sends out the finished manuscript under her own name and uses part of the money to pay for a trip to sunny Spain for both her and her friend at work, Lanna. Before they leave, Morvern cuts up her boyfriend's body and buries it in the Scottish highlands.

In Spain, Morvern seems vacantly cut off from both Lanna and the world. After both she and Lanna have one night stands with two young men, the two women separate. Morvern explores the wilds of Spain for a little bit, then ends back in another hotel. At the hotel, two representatives from a publishing company visit her and offer her 100,000 pounds for the novel she didn't really write. The snobbish publishing people turn out to be as vacant as Morvern, who returns to Scotland to claim her money.

Samantha Morton plays Morvern as an island all unto herself. The woman clearly does not feel bound by society's rules, but she also seems thoroughly cut off from any meaningful contact with other people. In fact, several scenes show that her character is more fascinated by the ugly underbelly of nature, represented by worms and bugs crawling amid vegetation, mud, dirt, grocery produce, and streams.

Secular critics have naturally responded favorably to the humanist worldview that seems the focus of this movie, which is based on a 1995 novel by Alan Warner. Although there are scenes in the movie where Morvern is surrounded by Christian symbols, such as crosses and statues of Jesus Christ, neither Morvern, director Lynne Ramsay or the critics take any particular notice of them. They're just part of the landscape, especially when Morvern goes to Spain. Furthermore, even though the humanist worldview of the movie implies that Morvern is trying to escape from her drab working class existence, nothing much more is made of this socialist conceit.

Thus, MORVERN CALLAR the movie is just as vacant, boring and aimless as its protagonist. It is an empty vessel that shows no real, lasting passion for anything but its own artistic pretensions.

Ironically, the only passion that appears to occupy the movie is its satirical view of the publishing people who visit Morvern to buy the rights to her novel. The movie shows that these people are clueless. The same might be said, however, of the snobbish, brainless attitude that those who write books and make movies like MORVERN CALLAR - and the people who wax so eloquently about such phony "masterpieces" - represent. These kinds of art works are meant to be appreciated only by an elite few, a secret, avant-garde cabal of Gnostics who enjoy lording it over the rest of humanity. No one of any real taste (or any real common sense, for that matter) would ever want to sit through something resembling MORVERN CALLAR. That's why self-indulgent movies like MORVERN CALLAR make almost no money, and seldom survive, but movies like THE LORD OF THE RINGS trilogy make lots of money and are beloved by millions.

MORVERN CALLAR contains some strong foul language, gruesome scenes, brief full male nudity, and scenes of sexual immorality. Its relative abhorrence lies more in its insipid worldview, insipid protagonist and insipid aesthetics, however. MOVIEGUIDEĀ® thinks most viewers will want to avoid such empty vessels.

Please address your comments to:

John Vanco & Noah Cowen

Co-Presidents

Cowboy Pictures

Cowboy Booking International

13 Laight Street, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10013

Phone: (212) 925-7800

Fax: (212) 965-5655

Email: info@cowboybi.com

Website: www.cowboybi.com

SUMMARY: MORVERN CALLAR is a Scottish movie about an aimless 21-year-old woman who commits brazen, disgusting acts while she vacantly tries to escape the boundaries of the society and the people around her. MORVERN CALLAR is an abhorrent movie, dramatically, philosophically, psychologically, morally, spiritually, and artistically.

In Brief: