SUPER SIZE ME

Consuming Mass Quantities

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 07, 2004

Starring: Morgan Spurlock, who also
narrates

Genre: Documentary

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: Not Rated

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films

Director: Morgan Spurlock PRODUCER:
Morgan Spurlock

Executive Producer:

Producer: Morgan Spurlock EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: J. R. Morley and
Heather Winters

Writer: N/A BASED ON THE NOVEL/PLAY
BY: N/A

Address Comments To:

Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., Chairman/CEO
The Samuel Goldwyn Co.
10203 Santa Monica Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90067
Phone: (310) 552-2255
Fax: (310) 284-8493

Content:

(So, H, AcapAcap, B, L, V, S N, A, D, M) Socialist humanist worldview with some anti-capitalist elements but also some positive moral elements warning about the dangers of gluttony and supporting eating a healthy diet; four obscenities (including one “f” word), one strong profanity, one light profanity, and image of vomit after young man throws up; man says he’ll punch his children when they pass by any fast food outlet so that they never eat fast food and images from a stomach operation are shown; references to fornication and cohabitation; upper and rear male nudity, plus implied proctology exam; some alcohol references; vegetarian compares eating meat to using heroin, but boyfriend humorously rebukes her for making such a comparison; and, some biased reporting.

GENRE: Documentary

Summary:

SUPER SIZE ME is an acclaimed documentary about obesity in America where a young filmmaker decides to measure his health while eating every day at a fast-food restaurant. The movie makes some good points about maintaining a healthy diet and avoiding fast food, but its perspective is socialistic and humanist, not biblical.

Review:

SUPER SIZE ME is an acclaimed documentary about obesity in America that has gotten the fast food industry to change some of its practices. It shows the impact that even a small movie like this can have on our society.

With the news media filled with reports about how much fatter Americans have become in the last 20 years, young filmmaker Morgan Spurlock decides to eat only at McDonald’s for 30 days straight. To measure his progress, he hires three doctors and a nutritionist, including a cardiologist. Two rules: 1) he can only get as much exercise as the average American gets (about four miles of walking a day); and, 2) whenever the McDonalds attendant asks him if he wants to “supersize” his food, he must agree.

While carrying out his bizarre diet, Spurlock visits several school lunch programs across the country and interviews several experts, including a former Surgeon General, a food industry representative and people on the street. When Spurlock’s liver starts becoming toxic and his weight starts skyrocketing, the three doctors express surprise at how badly his McDonalds diet seems to be affecting his health.

Several fast-food companies have decided to offer more healthy alternatives on their menus in the wake of Mr. Spurlock’s documentary, several lawsuits and scientific reports on obese Americans. Mr. Spurlock has an engaging, humorous personality, which holds the viewer’s attention. He makes a very good point about the unhealthy quality of much fast food.

The major flaw in the movie is that, while Spurlock promotes his new diet as an experiment, from the very beginning of the documentary he is very critical of the fast-food industry, displaying a bias that obviously affects the objectivity of his experiment. Spurlock also eats three generous McDonalds meals a day during his experiment, a very high calorie intake for even a modestly overweight person. The documentary also contains some gratuitous foul language and sexual references.

Mr. Spurlock seems to have a socialistic, humanist perspective that’s anti-capitalist. There is, however, a biblical way to approach eating. God wants us to eat healthy, because our bodies are His temple. Practical wisdom, as defined by the Book of Proverbs and the Gospels, also should tell us that the high fat content of many fast-food meals is something we should avoid most of the time. By promoting such ideals, Christians and other people can encourage the food industry to offer more healthy alternatives, without resorting to clumsy government intervention.

In Brief:

SUPER SIZE ME is an acclaimed documentary about obesity in America that has gotten the fast food industry to offer more healthy alternatives. It shows the impact that even a small movie like this can have on our society. With the news media filled with reports about how much fatter Americans have become in the last 20 years, young filmmaker Morgan Spurlock decides to eat only at McDonald’s for 30 days straight. To measure his progress, he hires three doctors and a nutritionist, including a cardiologist. When Spurlock’s liver starts becoming toxic and his weight starts skyrocketing, the three doctors express surprise at how badly his McDonalds diet seems to be affecting his health.

Mr. Spurlock has an engaging, humorous personality, which holds the viewer’s attention. He makes a very good point about the unhealthy quality of much fast food. The major flaw in the movie is that, while Spurlock promotes his new diet as an experiment, from the very beginning of the documentary he is very critical of the fast-food industry, displaying a bias that obviously affects the objectivity of his experiment. The documentary also contains some gratuitous foul language and sexual references.