THE BOYS OF ST. VINCENT

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Johnny Morina, Brian Dodd,
Jonathan Lewis, Jeremy Keefe,
Henry Czerny, Sebastian
Spence, Phillip Dinn, & Brian
Dooley

Genre: Drama

Audience: Adults

Rating: N/R (Not rated--Exhibitors do
not recommend these films for
anyone under 18)

Runtime: 93 minutes per part

Distributor: Alliance Communications
Entertainment

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Des Walsh, John N. Smith & Sam
Grana

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, LLL, VV, SS, NN, D, C) Biblical worldview with emphasis on human morality; 5 obscenities & 14 profanities in Pt. I, 4 obscenities & 9 profanities in Pt. II; beatings, implied & briefly depicted; sexual abuse of children, implied & depicted; brief male nudity in 2 shower scenes in Parts I & II, 1 brief view of male genitals in Pt. I; fatal drug abuse in Pt. II; and, 1 former ward of the orphanage forgives his tormentors & returns to the church in Pt II.

Summary:

THE BOYS OF ST. VINCENT is a low-key, relatively discreet film dealing with a highly volatile subject: sexual abuse of minors by members of a religious order. While informative and artistically superior, this movie is a horrifying look at a troubling and alarmingly current matter which will have little appeal for traditional, entertainment-oriented audiences.

Review:

THE BOYS OF ST. VINCENT is a discreet film dealing with a volatile subject: sexual abuse of minors by members of a religious order. The two-part film is divided into the period in which the actual abuse takes place and the date at which, fifteen years later, charges are finally brought against the abusers and the case comes to court. The objective of Part I is to establish for the viewer the extent of the misdeeds at St. Vincent and the efforts by a few concerned individuals to find out just what is going on in the cloistered, relatively autonomous institution. Part II chronicles the charges brought.

The subject matter, while inherently offensive, is worthy of attention. However, there is not a moment in which the tone shifts from the psychological, physical and spiritual damage, to one of prurient interest. THE BOYS OF ST. VINCENT effectively captures the horror of molestation by authority. However, there is a glimmer of hope when an older brother explains to his brother that he had to forgive the abusers because that he could not live with the hatred he felt toward them. However, even though the movie is informative and artistically superior, it probably will have little appeal for traditional, entertainment-oriented audiences.

In Brief: