THE IN-LAWS Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: May 23, 2003

Starring: Michael Douglas, Perry Perlmutar, Albert Brooks, Ryan Reynolds, Lindsay Sloane, Mike Beaver, and Candice Bergen

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Teenagers and adults REVIEWER:
Lisa A. Rice THE IN-LAWS is a
well-cast comedy starring
Albert Brooks and Michael
Douglas. Brooks is Dr. Jerry
Peyser, a mild-mannered,
slightly neurotic podiatrist
(he hates flying, heights, and
any sort of change) who
obviously just wants to lead a
careful, proper, hassle-free
life, and help his daughter to
have a well-ordered wedding.
Enter Michael Douglas. He is
Steve Tobias, a tanned,
jet-setting, fast-moving,
fast-talking man who meets the
Peysers after being chased
through the Prague by
Interpol, diving into a plane
with a gorgeous woman and
landing precariously on the
water. During their dinner at
a Chinese restaurant, Dr.
Peyser catches his
soon-to-be-in-law working some
sort of criminal-looking deal
in the men's room. Tobias's
son Mark, the groom-to-be,
also comes into the bathroom
and comments, "Oh, an
unconscious guy. You must be
working, dad." The son tries
to explain away his father to
his new bride, Melissa, and
her conservative parents. They
are not amused. Mark and
Melissa have a discussion
about how they should handle
the upcoming wedding and the
strange mix of parental
issues. When Melissa suggests
that the wedding should be for
them and not their parents,
Mark responds, "Oh, sweet,
funny, whimsical Melissa.
Weddings aren't for the bride
and groom!" It turns out that
Tobias is transporting some
sort of nuclear waste product
and working with the Russian
mob on the purchasing of a
submarine for a Frenchman. As
the FBI hones in on him, they
start tracking the quiet Dr.
Peyser as well. Soon the
reluctant doctor finds himself
unwittingly caught in an
adventure taking Barbra
Streisand's private plane to
France to continue the
international crime deal. Soon
Tobias confesses to Dr. Peyser
that he's with the CIA, but
Peyser doesn't believe it, and
he tries to make secret phone
calls to get himself rescued.
Back home, his partying
daughter, the bride-to-be, and
her mother just laugh it off,
and the doctor finds himself
in worse and worse
predicaments. In order to
escape, the doctor must
distract a pursuing homosexual
Frenchman while Tobias pulls a
switch on the bad guys. The
Frenchman finally tries to
kiss Dr. Peyser, who is
completely disgusted. When the
men do finally manage to
escape, they wonder if they'll
be able to make it back to
their own children's weddings.
With the FBI after both of
them and Tobias's female
partner's possible betrayal,
it looks like all will be
sabotaged. To make matters
worse, the ex Mrs. Tobias
(Candice Bergen) has arrived
and is intent upon discussing
old, sensitive issues and his
lack of good parenting through
the years. Though Tobias has
booked Casey and the Sunshine
Band, Melissa's best friend
reveals some information that
could cause the whole wedding
to be called off. Finally, to
top it all off, the
submarine-for-sale manages to
surface right along the shore
of the wedding party, and
high-speed chases and
explosions soon ensue. Amidst
the fireworks, Tobias and Dr.
Peyser each get the
opportunity to re-evaluate
their priorities and really
see their families and their
own lives with new eyes. THE
IN-LAWS has a lot of great
laughs, and Albert Brooks
truly steals the show as the
reluctant, neurotic doctor
who's being dragged through an
international espionage
adventure by a crazy
soon-to-be relative, Michael
Douglas. There is a lot of
silliness and hokiness, but
there is also a lot of
physical humor and great
stunts. Regrettably, one of
the main shticks of the story
is where a homosexual
Frenchman is pursuing the
doctor. The humor in this
running gag goes about two
notches too far. THE IN-LAWS
also has its share of
language, with about 15
obscenities and seven
profanities, and there are
allusions to drug and alcohol
use and abuse. The wedding is
officiated by a female rabbi
and a Buddhist priest, though
the protagonist thanks the
Almighty several times. At its
core, however, THE INLAWS hits
on the issue that so many
Hollywood writers understand:
the issue of the heart of the
father. Though portrayed
through humor, it is revealed
that both the bride and the
groom have problems with their
fathers, and both fathers have
problems being what their
children and families need
them to be. This changes in
the end, happily, as "heaven"
brings everyone up against a
wall to face their own hearts.
It would be great if some of
these movies would go one step
further and show how the One
True God is the father to the
fatherless and the only
lasting mediator of broken
relationships! Overall, THE
INLAWS may do well at the box
office as a mindlessly
entertaining comedy for "date
night." Albert Brooks and
Michael Douglas may not have
the star attraction to bring
in big crowds, however. Please
address your comments
to: Barry M. Meyer,
Chairman/CEO Warner Bros.,
Inc. 4000 Warner
Blvd. Burbank, CA
91522-0001 Phone: (818)
954-6000 Website:
www.movies.warnerbros.com

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Address Comments To:

Content:

(PaPa, B, FR, Ho, LL, VV, S, N, A, DD, M) Worldly outlook with Michael Douglas character escaping his pain by living for danger and excitement with some nods to God and the Jewish faith with references to thanking the Almighty, having a female rabbi officiate a ceremony, etc. as well as some nods to false religions with Buddhist priest also officiating wedding and reference to Candice Bergen's character getting help from Indian guru, and a running gag with minor homosexual character; 15 obscenities and seven profanities; violence includes fist fights, slapping, woman pushed off speed boat, etc.; plenty of homosexual humor with a horrified Albert Brooks character being pursued by a homosexual French man, who finally manages to kiss him; slight male rear nudity with Albert Brooks character in a horrible French bathing suit; several portrayals of alcohol and smoking, plus some allusions to drug use with guys giving each other concoctions to knock each other out; and, lying, disrespectfulness to parents, references to criminal activity, and groom tells story about premarital sex.

GENRE: Comedy

PaPa

B

FR

Ho

LL

VV

S

N

A

DD

M

Summary:

In THE INLAWS, a mild-mannered, slightly neurotic foot doctor discovers that his new in-laws are international smugglers as he gets caught up in a wild adventure not of his choosing. This very funny, well-cast movie is marred by some homosexual humor and foul language.

Review:

THE IN-LAWS is a well-cast comedy starring Albert Brooks and Michael Douglas. Brooks is Dr. Jerry Peyser, a mild-mannered, slightly neurotic podiatrist (he hates flying, heights, and any sort of change) who obviously just wants to lead a careful, proper, hassle-free life, and help his daughter to have a well-ordered wedding. Enter Michael Douglas. He is Steve Tobias, a tanned, jet-setting, fast-moving, fast-talking man who meets the Peysers after being chased through the Prague by Interpol, diving into a plane with a gorgeous woman and landing precariously on the water.

During their dinner at a Chinese restaurant, Dr. Peyser catches his soon-to-be-in-law working some sort of criminal-looking deal in the men's room. Tobias's son Mark, the groom-to-be, also comes into the bathroom and comments, "Oh, an unconscious guy. You must be working, dad." The son tries to explain away his father to his new bride, Melissa, and her conservative parents. They are not amused.

Mark and Melissa have a discussion about how they should handle the upcoming wedding and the strange mix of parental issues. When Melissa suggests that the wedding should be for them and not their parents, Mark responds, "Oh, sweet, funny, whimsical Melissa. Weddings aren't for the bride and groom!"

It turns out that Tobias is transporting some sort of nuclear waste product and working with the Russian mob on the purchasing of a submarine for a Frenchman. As the FBI hones in on him, they start tracking the quiet Dr. Peyser as well. Soon the reluctant doctor finds himself unwittingly caught in an adventure taking Barbra Streisand's private plane to France to continue the international crime deal.

Soon Tobias confesses to Dr. Peyser that he's with the CIA, but Peyser doesn't believe it, and he tries to make secret phone calls to get himself rescued. Back home, his partying daughter, the bride-to-be, and her mother just laugh it off, and the doctor finds himself in worse and worse predicaments. In order to escape, the doctor must distract a pursuing homosexual Frenchman while Tobias pulls a switch on the bad guys. The Frenchman finally tries to kiss Dr. Peyser, who is completely disgusted.

When the men do finally manage to escape, they wonder if they'll be able to make it back to their own children's weddings. With the FBI after both of them and Tobias's female partner's possible betrayal, it looks like all will be sabotaged. To make matters worse, the ex Mrs. Tobias (Candice Bergen) has arrived and is intent upon discussing old, sensitive issues and his lack of good parenting through the years.

Though Tobias has booked Casey and the Sunshine Band, Melissa's best friend reveals some information that could cause the whole wedding to be called off. Finally, to top it all off, the submarine-for-sale manages to surface right along the shore of the wedding party, and high-speed chases and explosions soon ensue. Amidst the fireworks, Tobias and Dr. Peyser each get the opportunity to re-evaluate their priorities and really see their families and their own lives with new eyes.

THE IN-LAWS has a lot of great laughs, and Albert Brooks truly steals the show as the reluctant, neurotic doctor who's being dragged through an international espionage adventure by a crazy soon-to-be relative, Michael Douglas. There is a lot of silliness and hokiness, but there is also a lot of physical humor and great stunts.

Regrettably, one of the main shticks of the story is where a homosexual Frenchman is pursuing the doctor. The humor in this running gag goes about two notches too far. THE IN-LAWS also has its share of language, with about 15 obscenities and seven profanities, and there are allusions to drug and alcohol use and abuse. The wedding is officiated by a female rabbi and a Buddhist priest, though the protagonist thanks the Almighty several times.

At its core, however, THE INLAWS hits on the issue that so many Hollywood writers understand: the issue of the heart of the father. Though portrayed through humor, it is revealed that both the bride and the groom have problems with their fathers, and both fathers have problems being what their children and families need them to be. This changes in the end, happily, as "heaven" brings everyone up against a wall to face their own hearts. It would be great if some of these movies would go one step further and show how the One True God is the father to the fatherless and the only lasting mediator of broken relationships!

Overall, THE INLAWS may do well at the box office as a mindlessly entertaining comedy for "date night." Albert Brooks and Michael Douglas may not have the star attraction to bring in big crowds, however.

Please address your comments to:

Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO

Warner Bros., Inc.

4000 Warner Blvd.

Burbank, CA 91522-0001

Phone: (818) 954-6000

Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

In Brief: