THE MARTIAN CHILD

Latent Hostility?

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: November 02, 2007

Starring: John Cusack, Bobby Coleman, Joan Cusack, Amanda Peet, Oliver Platt, Anjelica Huston, and Sophie Okonedo

Genre: Drama

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG

Runtime: 106 minutes

Address Comments To:

Robert Shaye and Michael Lynne
Co-Chairman/Co-CEO
New Line Cinema
116 North Robertson Blvd., Suite 200
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (310) 854-5811
Fax: (310) 354-1824
Website: www.newline.com

Content:

(PaPa, BB, FRFR, Ab, H, O, LL, V, M) Strongly mixed pagan worldview with some strong positive moral elements (which often take precedence) regarding how adoptive parent treats and cares for weird boy traumatized by his birth parents rejecting him but too many references to false religions and false religious/philosophical concepts including a reference to Buddha, a reference to Zen Buddhism, a reference to Hindu yogis when woman hears that boy who says he’s a Martian likes to hang upside down, and precocious little girl recites the false anti-Christian philosophical/religious notion that “Jesus is important, but other religions are just as relevant,” plus brief humanist psychoanalysis when adoptive father opines that boy is probably using psychological defense mechanisms to escape reality and movie suggests boy has possible psychic abilities when boy seems able to wish some things to happen and change traffic lights because he claims to be a Martian able to make “Martian wishes”; one obscenity, five strong profanities and six light profanities, plus a vulgar joke about dogs licking their private parts; vase accidentally breaks and man and boy break other things to lighten tension; no sex scenes but widowed man invites woman to spend night in guest room but she doesn’t stay and they kiss goodnight and a mention is made that widowed man’s wife thought he was great in bed; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, mention is made that boy sometimes steals things from classmates, adoptive parent accused of indulging child too much, and boy runs away on his own to be taken back to Mars he says.

Summary:

MARTIAN CHILD stars John Cusack in a story about a widowed man who adopts a troubled young boy who tells everyone that he’s really a Martian sent to study the people on Earth. The relationships in MARTIAN CHILD are often funny, charming and heartwarming, but the movie contains too many unacceptable references to Eastern religions and other false philosophical notions, including a comment that other religions are just as relevant as Jesus Christ.

Review:

MARTIAN CHILD is an often moving and winsome story about a weird boy struggling with abandonment issues, but the movie clearly has a strong, mixed worldview with too many references to Eastern Religion and other false religious and false philosophical notions. Though parental love and patience wins out, and is extolled, the movie’s clear but subtle lack of respect for traditional Judeo-Christian teachings make MARTIAN CHILD unacceptable viewing for Christians and Jews and their heretical offshoots, such as Mormonism and “Jehovah’s Witnesses.”

The movie is based on an autobiographical novel about a single homosexual man who adopts a boy, written by homosexual science fiction author David Gerrold, who wrote the classic “Trouble with Tribbles” episode for the original TV series STAR TREK. The movie, however, turns the man into a widower who is still feeling pain over the loss of his beloved wife, Mary.

In the story, David Gordon is a successful science fiction author. A friend of his invites David to adopt Dennis, a troubled little boy who tells people he’s really a Martian. When David meets Dennis, Dennis wears a heavy belt because of earth’s lighter gravity and stays in a cardboard box outside because of the stronger sunlight. David makes friends with Dennis by bringing him some sunblock cream and a pair of sunglasses.

Despite his doubts, and the doubts of government psychologists, David brings Dennis home. He caters to the fantasy whims of the child, while trying desperately to draw Dennis out of his shell. Dennis has trouble at school, however, and keeps saying that the Martians will come to take him back when his mission studying Earth is finished.

Though David makes great progress, things come to a head when David has to attend a party announcing his newest novel.

The basic relationship between David and Dennis is often funny, charming and heartwarming, but the movie contains too many references to Eastern religions and other false philosophical notions. For example, David’s childhood friend, Harlee, says that Dennis has a Zen Buddhist quality about him. Also, a precocious little girl says to David when he utters a profanity, “Jesus is important, but other religions are just as relevant.” The movie never, never, ever, ever, ever (to paraphrase a line of dialogue from the movie) counteracts these false, dangerous viewpoints, so it becomes obvious that the filmmakers, and perhaps the original author, have some latent hostility against both the Old and New Testament, against religious Jews, and against Jesus Christ and Christianity. Even a few scenes set during Thanksgiving and Christmas fail to mention belief in God, Christianity or the Baby Jesus. Thus, the movie plays like it’s set in a Post-Christian American society where such things are no longer important. By the way, this sounds like many people the MOVIEGUIDE® staff has met in the science fiction fandom community, the community from which David Gerrold, the original author, comes. Why, then, should the world’s two billion Christians go see this movie, not to mention those Jews who regularly attend synagogue and celebrate Jewish holidays and festivals?

MARTIAN CHILD also contains some foul language, including a few strong profanities, but it contains no crude sexual content and no explicit nudity. Consequently, it is rated PG, not PG-13 or R.

In Brief:

In MARTIAN CHILD, David Gordon is a successful science fiction author. A friend invites David to adopt Dennis, a troubled little boy who tells people he’s a Martian. Dennis wears a heavy belt because of earth’s lighter gravity and stays in a cardboard box outside because of the stronger sunlight. David makes friends with Dennis by bringing him some sunblock and sunglasses. Despite his doubts, and the doubts of government psychologists, David brings Dennis home. He caters to the fantasy whims of the child, while trying to draw Dennis out of his shell. Dennis has trouble at school and keeps saying that the Martians will come soon to take him back. Things come to a head when David has to attend a party announcing his newest novel.

The relationship between David and Dennis is often funny, charming and heartwarming, but the movie contains too many references to Eastern religions and other false philosophical notions. For example, there is a reference to Zen Buddhism and a comment that “Jesus is important, but other religions are just as relevant.” Thus, MARTIAN CHILD has an unacceptable mixed pagan worldview plus unnecessary strong profanities.