THE NINES

Limp Thriller

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 31, 2007

Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Hope Davis,
Melissa McCarthy & Elle
Fanning

Genre: Drama/Thriller

Audience: Adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 98 minutes

Distributor: Newmarket Films

Director: John August

Executive Producer: iller **

Producer: Bruce Cohen, Dan Etheridge,
Dan Jinks & Todd King
(co-producer)

Writer: John August

Address Comments To:

Newmarket Films
Chris Ball and William Tyrer
Partners
Newmarket Capital Group
202 North Danon Drive
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Phone: (310) 858-7472
Fax: (310) 858-7473
Website: www. newmarketfilms.com
Email: info@newmarketfilms.com

Content:

(PaPa, FRFR, Ev, E, Ho, LLL, V, SS, N, AAA, DD, MM) Mostly mixed pagan worldview with non-Christian and non-Biblical references concerning God and the creation of the world as well as one reference to karma, some comments about environmentally-friendly vehicles, and movie implies one character is homosexual; 28 obscenities (about half of which are “f” words) and eight profanities; light violence includes man sets fire to old clothes and it is implied he burns down his house and man slaps woman; sexuality includes depicted masturbation (although nothing is shown) as sounds of a pornographic movie play in the background, an adulterous kiss, man gropes woman and some married kissing; nudity includes naturalistic upper male nudity in a few scenes and female cleavage; heavy alcohol use and depicted drunkenness as man drives drunk; strong references to drugs as character buys and abuses crack; and, includes lying, cutthroat business tactics and man violates his house arrest.

Summary:

THE NINES is a not-quite-thrilling thriller that follows the lives of three people: a troubled actor, a neurotic TV series creator and a video game designer, all played by Ryan Reynolds, as they find their lives intersecting in mysterious and disturbing ways. Straining to be imaginative and engaging, the movie fails to excite and contains strong foul language, sexual content, alcohol abuse, drug references, and a mixed pagan worldview with non-Christian, non-biblical elements.

Review:

THE NINES is a drama that follows the lives of three people: a troubled actor, a neurotic TV series creator and a video game designer, all played by Ryan Reynolds, as they find their lives intersecting in mysterious and disturbing ways.

The movie takes place in three acts. In the first act, Ryan Reynolds plays a troubled actor, who has recently suffered a breakup and has accidentally burned down his house. He is then confined to house arrest in an absent stranger’s home after he goes on a drug, drinking and driving binge. While at the house, he begins to hear strange noises and the number nine keeps appearing everywhere.

The second act follows Ryan Reynolds as a TV show creator followed around by a reality television series crew as he tries to get his pilot episode picked up by a major network. In this act, the character questions the god-like aspects of show creators who have the ability to create life and make their created characters seem like puppets on a string.

The third act shows Ryan Reynolds as a wildly popular video game designer whose car has broken down in the Hollywood hills. Stranded, he feels more like someone is pulling his strings. In each act, Reynolds’ characters seem to be fragments of each other existing in time and space.

Throughout this whole movie, the recurring theme is the relationship between creator and creation. However, in THE NINES, the concept of God as Creator is not explored in a satisfying way. Instead, most audience members will feel as though this is another self-indulgent look at the inner-workings of the creative minds in Hollywood who think that they really are gods. The movie is laced with “industry-speak” and therefore will only appeal to a small audience.

Also, the story strains to be an imaginative and mind-bending thriller, but there is never a real sense of danger for any of the three characters. So the resolution neither bends the mind nor thrills. Reynolds gives three distinct performances, and his work should be credited. His fellow cast members each hold their own on-screen, but the movie itself feels like a retread and limp.

Media-wise viewers should also be warned about the mixed pagan worldview, the strong foul language and the sexual content, which includes depicted masturbation, although nothing is shown. THE NINES also has very strong alcohol abuse and some strong drug references.

In Brief:

THE NINES stars Ryan Reynolds in three, very distinct roles about a troubled actor under house arrest, a neurotic TV series creator who is fighting to get his new pilot picked up by a major network, and a video game designer who finds himself in a very threatening situation after his car breaks down in the Hollywood hills. All three characters find their lives intersecting in mysterious and disturbing ways. In each instance, the characters seem to be fragments of each other existing in time and space.

Throughout THE NINES, the recurring theme is the relationship between creator and creation. However, the story strains to be an imaginative and mind-bending thriller, but there is never a real sense of danger for any of the three characters. So the resolution neither bends the mind nor thrills. Media-wise viewers should also be warned about the movie’s strong foul language, sexual content and its mixed pagan worldview, which refers to God and creation in a non-Christian, non-biblical manner. THE NINES has very strong alcohol abuse and some strong drug references. Taking into account these objectionable elements, MOVIEGUIDE® advises an Excessive rating.