BYE BYE BLUES Add To My Top 10

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Rebecca Jenkins, Michael Ontkean, Luke Reilly, Stuart Margolin, Robyn Stevan, & Kate Reid

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: PG

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: Circle Releasing

Director: Anne Wheeler

Executive Producer:

Producer: Anne Wheeler

Writer: Anne Wheeler

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Content:

Profanity and obscenity; drunkenness; brief violence; and, promiscuity and very brief nudity.

Summary:


Review:

Stationed in India during World War II, Daisy Cooper returns home with her two little ones to Canada when her doctor husband, Teddy, is transferred to Malaysia. Unsure if her husband is dead or alive after he is caught in the fall of Singapore, Daisy is labeled a "grass widow" -- someone who is waiting for her husband while taking care of the family by herself.

An accomplished pianist, Daisy joins a band that is playing at the base in order to pay the bills. Max Gramley, the American trombonist, soon begins to give her private lessons. He attempts to romance her, but she rebuffs his advances.

Two years pass. On tour, Daisy now heads the band while relegating the care of her children to her sister, who is a bad influence. Max, meanwhile, asks to marry Daisy. When news of the war's end and Teddy's coming home arrive, Daisy is filled more with remorse than rejoicing. In fact, she is quite saddened at film's end, and looks longingly at the band that is leaving her behind. As they pull away, the soundtrack kicks in with "Bye Bye Blues."

It is natural for her to feel sad and commendable that she does the right thing; however, the film's premise is too self-centered: you will be unhappy if you don't do your own thing. This is in direct opposition to Matthew 10:39, "Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it." Also shameful was the film's tendency to take the present-day problems of single parent families, unwanted pregnancy, abortion and parental approval for promiscuous sex, and inject them as commonplace into an earlier time period when, in fact, that was not the case. Do film makers think they can rewrite history? Apparently so.

To its credit, the picture has breathtaking shots of the sweeping Canadian landscape. It also has a good 1940s look, but there's not enough of the period music, and the singing is only so-so. Moreover, there are profanities and obscenities, alcoholism and drunkenness, and an instance of barroom violence. The recommendation goes against seeing BYE BYE BLUES.

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