DEEP BLUE

Exploring God’s Creation

Content +2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: June 03, 2005

Starring: Narrated by Michael Gambon

Genre: Documentary

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: 83 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films/Buena Vista/Walt
Disney Company

Director: Andy Byatt and Alastair
Fothergill

Executive Producer: Stefan Beiten, Andre Sikojev,
and Nikolaus Weil

Producer: Sophokles Tasioulis and Alix
Tidmarsh

Writer:

Address Comments To:

Bob and Harvey Weinstein
Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013
Phone: (323) 822-4100 and (212) 941-3800
Fax: (212) 941-3846
Website: www.miramax.com

Content:

(B, V) Moral worldview that appreciates creation and the natural world; whales snatch smaller animals but there is no gore or violence; and, nothing else objectionable.

Summary:

DEEP BLUE is a slow-moving but fascinating documentary that examines dolphins, polar bears, coral, sand crabs, and many other creatures that live in the ocean. With some interesting camera tricks, this movie displays the complexity and true grandeur of God’s creation. Children with an itch for science will enjoy it as much as curious-minded adults.

Review:

DEEP BLUE is a slow-moving but fascinating exploration under the water’s surface. The camera catches dolphins, albatrosses, polar bears, coral, sand crabs, and many other creatures in their natural habitats.

One of the movie’s most impressive shots captures the profile view of a wave as it rises, curls and falls. The footage is slowed down so that each stage of the wave’s formation is precise and visible. With clever film tricks like that one, DEEP BLUE is an awesome educational tool allowing viewers to dissect wonders of nature they might otherwise overlook. When you’re standing on the beach, a wave just looks like a wave, but, in this movie, a wave is an incredible process.

DEEP BLUE is not about water, however; it’s about the creatures that live inside it. The two most memorable segments focus on polar bears as they search for solid ice to walk on and live food to eat and on the mysterious organisms deep, deep at the bottom of the ocean, with their colorful lights and strange shapes.

What makes DEEP BLUE frustrating is its episodic structure: the movie investigates one creature then moves onto the next, with no build-up and little drama. The experience definitely requires a long attention span. Fortunately, however, the movie is only 80 minutes long, so no one will get too bored.

DEEP BLUE is an interesting and educational look at what lives under the sea. Children with an itch for science will enjoy it as much as curious minded adults.

In Brief:

DEEP BLUE is a slow-moving but fascinating exploration of creatures living in the ocean. The camera catches dolphins, albatrosses, polar bears, coral, sand crabs, and many others in their natural habitats. With some clever film tricks, DEEP BLUE is an awesome educational tool allowing viewers to dissect wonders of nature they might otherwise overlook. When you’re standing on the beach, a wave just looks like a wave, but in this movie, a wave is an incredible process. The complexity and grandeur of nature is on display. The most memorable segments focus on polar bears and the mysterious organisms at the ocean bottom with their colorful lights and strange shapes.

What makes DEEP BLUE frustrating is its episodic structure. The movie investigates one creature then moves onto the next, with no build-up and little drama, so it requires a long attention span. Fortunately, however, the movie is only 80 minutes long, so no one will get too bored. DEEP BLUE is an interesting and educational look at what lives under the sea. Children with an itch for science will enjoy it as much as curious-minded adults. Even better, it has no objectionable elements at all!