Final Destination 5 Add To My Top 10

Empty Thrills

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 12, 2011

Starring: Nicholas D’Agosto, Emma Bell, Miles Fisher, Courtney B. Vance, Arlen Escarpeta, David Koechner, Tony Todd, P.J. Byrne, Ellen Wroe

Genre: Horror

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 92 minutes

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey L. Bewkes, CEO, Time Warner
Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Alan F. Horn, President/COO
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (New Line Cinema)
Jeff Robinov, President, Warner Bros. Pictures Group
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(HHH, O, FR, B, LL, VVV, S, A, M) Very strong but not in-your-face humanist worldview, with occult hints, where Death is seen as a force of nature pretty much divorced from God or any other supernatural being, where the humanist lyrics of “All we are is dust in the wind” by the rock group Kansas precedes gruesome deaths and where mere survival is the main goal, plus a couple references to Buddha, the false religious figure of Buddhism, in a statue at a legitimate Asian massage parlor and light moral elements include man tries to save his girlfriend from would-be murderer; 24 obscenities (including a few “f” words) and one My God profanity; very strong often gruesome and bloody violence includes people impaled, woman breaks her neck and legs with bones and muscle sticking out, man decapitated by Buddha statue, man falls on acupuncture needles on his forehead and chest, woman’s eyeball pops out after she falls to her death, car runs over eyeball, flying wrench crushes man’s skull through his eyeballs, man shot to death, hot tar burns man to death, suspension bridge collapses with cars and people on it; no sex scenes but man discusses going to bed together with his girlfriend; no nudity; alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, murderer tries to kill a witness.

Summary:

FINAL DESTINATION 5 continues the infamous series with a story of seven young co-workers and their boss who are stalked by death when they escape a tragic, spectacular, gruesome accident on a suspension bridge. The only goal of FINAL DESTINATION 5 is to titillate the audience with gruesome, freakish accidental deaths, mixed in a plot that leads to murder and that includes plenty of foul language.

Review:

FINAL DESTINATION 5 continues the infamous series like the last movie – by putting everything in 3D. This heightens the thrills and titillation, with all sorts of objects and bloody body parts flying at the audience, but it doesn’t contribute anything else to the depressing storyline.

In the story, a group of young adults are traveling on a bus to a company retreat. As the bus stops in the middle of a suspension bridge for construction work, one of them gets a premonition that the bridge is about to collapse, killing them all in gruesome ways. Sam, the one who gets the premonition, manages to warn his girlfriend, Molly, and his best friend, Peter. They and five others, including their perpetually perturbed boss, Dennis, escape with their lives.

At the funeral for the other employees, the coroner warns Sam, “Death doesn’t like to be cheated.” Sure enough, one by one, the survivors begin meeting their doom in freaky, gruesome accidents. After three deaths, Sam consults the coroner again. He suggests that Death may be satisfied if the survivors can kill someone else to take their place, but can Sam and his friends become murderers?

None of the FINAL DESTINATION sequels have a happy ending. Number 5 is no exception. Everybody dies, but not before the audience is subjected to multiple gruesome, often bloody deaths. The movie depicts death in a humanist way, like a force of nature rather than God’s punishment for sin. FINAL DESTINATION 5 also has plenty of foul language, so media-wise viewers will find very little to cheer for here.

To those who do not know Christ, death is the worst menace, the final closure on an eternity without hope. Yet, according to Philippians 1:21, to those who are assured of their salvation, “to live is Christ, to die is gain.” Hence, a fear of death is not necessary. Though death never takes any form, Satan does come to steal, kill and destroy. He can be defeated, however, by God’s grace through faith in Jesus Christ.

The progressive chaos depicted in this movie is far-fetched. Though it’s appointed for man to die once, FINAL DESTINATION 5 eventually gets a little ridiculous in the lengths of random everyday objects and situations falling apart and killing people, objects that otherwise are safe.

In Brief:

FINAL DESTINATION 5 continues the infamous series like the last movie – by putting everything in 3D. A group of young adults traveling to a company retreat get a premonition that the suspension bridge will collapse and kill everyone. Sam, the one who gets the premonition, warns his girlfriend, Molly, and his best friend, Peter. They and five others escape with their lives. At the funeral for the other employees, the coroner warns Sam, “Death doesn’t like to be cheated.” Sure enough, one by one, the survivors begin meeting their doom in freaky, gruesome accidents. After three deaths, Sam consults the coroner again. He suggests that Death may be satisfied if the survivors can kill someone else to take their place, but can Sam and his friends become murderers?

None of the FINAL DESTINATION sequels have a happy ending. Number 5 is no exception. Everybody dies, but not before the audience is subjected to multiple gruesome, often bloody deaths. The movie depicts death as a force of nature rather than God’s punishment for sin. FINAL DESTINATION 5 also has plenty of foul language, so media-wise viewers will find little to enjoy here.