JACQUOT

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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

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Summary:

Directed by Agnes Varda, JACQUOT is a loving, though poorly executed tribute to her late husband, filmmaker Jacques Demy. Essentially a film biography, the film focuses on Demy's early interest in filmmaking and documents the significant events leading to his becoming a respected filmmaker.

Review:

JACQUOT reminds this reviewer of a home movie that found a feature film distributor. Directed by Demy's wife, Agnes Varda, this film is a loving, though poorly executed, tribute to her late husband, filmmaker, Jacques Demy. Essentially a film biography, JACQUOT drags on scene after scene describing the boyhood of "Jacquot," the nickname given to Demy as a child. Demy's boyhood years are punctuated by significant events, including the Nazi invasion; however, the poor artistic execution falls short of bringing these events to life. The result is a bland, if not boring, account of Demy's early years. The film focuses on Demy's early interest in filmmaking and documents the significant events leading to his becoming a respected filmmaker. Interspersed in the story are clips from Demy's films, illustrating how his work was influenced by his early years.

A sense of mortality pervades the storyline. Also, unfortunately, Varda chooses to highlight each of the small advances Demy makes in filmmaking, from his first camera to a more advanced camera that makes it possible for him to produce an amateur film. To its credit, JACQUOT highlights the love one woman has for her deceased husband. It also portrays men in a positive light, unlike many recent films. However, the film suffers from either poor scriptwriting, or a boring subject.

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