MICROCOSMOS

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Language        
Violence        
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Release Date: October 09, 1996

Starring: Swallow-tail butterfly,
Climbing caterpillar, Burgundy
snails, & more

Genre: Documentary

Audience:

Rating: G

Runtime: 77 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Films

Director: Claude Nuridsany & Marie
Pernennou EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Michel Faure,
Philippe Gautier & Andre
Lazare, Patrick Lancelot

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer:

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Content:

(E, V) Environmentalist worldview featuring nature's insect world; some natural violence including natural predatory instincts such as a spider wrapping a prey in its web, stag beetles fight it out to a fatal end & a pheasant kicking and eating bugs as its dinner; and, snail embracing

Summary:

In MICROCOSMOS, insect-life is captured with amazing delicacy and detail in this documentary on some of nature's smallest and finest. An excellent and remarkable experience of nature that will amaze and amuse, even for those who show little patience for bugs. An educational must see for the whole family.

Review:

As the opening sequences sweep down from blue skies to earth, MICROCOSMOS prepares you for a journey of the otherwise undiscovered. This documentary of nature's smallest is an exquisite experience of what some bugs do to pass the day away. From busy ants scurrying to hard their anti-hills with all kinds of everything to slimy slugs slithering out of their cocoons, the moments are all precious and magnificent. These are the superstars of this 77-minute documentary -- crawling, creeping or just plain captivating. They eat their own cocoons, they fight to defend their abode or simply show who's mightier. They flaunt their gossamer wings, take night swims or simply blend into their environment.

With only some minor narration, MICROCOSMOS leaves you to enjoy its sights. A brilliant soundtrack and crisp, precise editing make this documentary both a witty and eye-opening. In-between its loving and roving eye on the bugs of this world, the documentary splashes colors on the screen by letting fields flora burst open in flowering splendor. As vines unfurl and raindrops pelt down, their magnification takes hues and shapes unfamiliar to the naked eye. Rated G, but some scenes showing natural laws of survival might have to be explained to very young children. Otherwise, MICROCOSMOS is an exhilarating experience in nature.

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