ONCE UPON A TIME...WHEN WE WERE COLORED

Content +2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: All Freeman Jr., Phylicia
Rashad, Leon, Paula Kelly,
Bernie Casey, Isaac Hayes,
Polly Bergen, & Richard
Roundtree

Genre: Historical Drama

Audience:

Rating: PG

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: Republic Pictures

Director: Tim Reid

Executive Producer: Butch Lewis

Producer: Michael Bennett & Tim Reid

Writer: Paul W. CooperBASED ON THE
NOVEL BY: Clifton Taulbert

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, C, L, V, S, A, M) Moral biblical worldview with positive references to God & many, many positive depictions of Christianity; positive portrayals of community; 6 vulgarities (mostly use of the "N" word in reference to blacks); KKK parade, seductive fondling & dancing results in a juke joint fight involving a razor, broken bottle, & a baseball bat as weapons; implied fornication (not justified); boys ogle women dancing in carnival girly show; alcohol consumption in juke joint; boy steals money but promises to pay it back; and, birth of baby in cotton fields


Summary:

ONCE UPON A TIME...WHEN WE WERE COLORED, based upon the critically acclaimed book chronicles the early life of its author Clifton Taulbert. Clifton is encouraged by the Christian faith, love and kinship of his tightly knit "colored" community to overcome the racial intolerance prevalent in the deep South of the 1950s and 60's. The movie contains only moderately questionable elements while promoting Christianity, family loyalty, personal responsibility, and a biblical worldview.


Review:

ONCE UPON A TIME...WHEN WE WERE COLORED, based upon the critically acclaimed book, chronicles the early life of its author Clifton Taulbert in Glen Allen, Mississippi. In the deep South in the 1950s and early 60s, education means segregation. Clifton first formal lesson from Poppa Taulbert at age 5 is to learn to recognize what a "W" and a "C" look like, so he can tell the difference between those things like restrooms and water fountains that are for "Whites only" and those that are for the "Colored". He quickly learns the difference between tolerance and intolerance by comparing what he understands from his close knit community with the racial intolerance he experiences on the other side of the railroad tracks.
We too have a learning experience as we watch the swelling tide that led to the Civil Rights Movement. Production quality is generally fine in this independent movie directed by Tim Reid and starring a cast of excellent actors. The producers did a fine job of creating the look and feel of the era. This movie is worth a ticket price, as it contains only moderately questionable elements while it promotes Christianity, family loyalty, personal responsibility, and a biblical worldview.


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