REDEMPTION ROAD

Finding Forgiveness

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 29, 2011

Starring: Michael Clark Duncan, Morgan Simpson, Kiele Sanchez, Taryn Manning, Tom Skerritt, Luke Perry

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 90 minutes

Address Comments To:

Mark Borde and Susan Jackson
Co-Presidents
Freestyle Releasing
6310 San Vicente Blvd., Suite 500
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Phone: (323) 330-9920; Fax: (323) 330-9939
Website: www.freestylereleasing.com; Email: mark@freestylereleasing.com

Content:

(CC, BB, Pa, LL, V, S, AA, DD, MM) The movie has a Christian/Biblical worldview in conflict with pagan elements where forgiveness is the primary subject of the movie but the behavior calling for forgiveness is graphically displayed; 17 obscenities, one profanity; man threatens with knife, man shoots and kills someone; implied sexual involvement with someone else’s wife; no nudity; heavy drinking and drunkenness but this is roundly condemned and very bad consequences of this behavior are clearly shown; smoking and drug use; and, general bad character needing but finding redemption, cheating and walking out on a debt.


Summary:

REDEMPTION ROAD will probably not do well on the church dinner-and-a-movie circuit but it does contain some strong Christian references and a wonderful message about forgiveness. The language and pre-forgiven behavior is simply so strong that Movieguide® must call for extreme caution.


Review:

EDEMPTION ROAD will probably not do well on the church dinner-and-a-movie circuit, but it does contain some strong Christian references and a wonderful message about forgiveness. The language and pre-forgiven behavior is simply so strong that Movieguide® must call for extreme caution.
The movie opens with Jefferson Bailey, the son of a popular blues musician, drinking heavily and suffering from stage fright. He loses his day job and is threatened by a friend because he has been too friendly with his friend’s wife and he owes them money. At the same time, he’s invited by a stranger named Augy to travel from Austin, Texas to Hunstville, Ala. to receive an inheritance from his grandfather who recently died. He winds up leaving with Augy simply to escape the friend’s wrath.
As the two travel from Austin to Hunstville, they gradually become friends. At one point, they stop near a black church. Due to some confusion Jefferson winds up going to the church looking for Augy. The church rocks with the music of “Oh Happy Day” and “Jesus on the Mainline.”
The movie includes considerable drinking, drugs and smoking, but comes on very strongly against the evils of intoxication. Much of the suffering in the movie that calls for forgiveness is the direct result of bad behavior resulting from intoxication. In fact, the movie even pays homage to Alcoholics Anonymous, with Jefferson passing an “are you an alcoholic test.”
The movie seems slow in spots, and it’s difficult to care a great deal about what becomes of Jefferson, but the acting and production quality are good. Michael Clark Duncan is impressive and likeable as Augy. As in THE GREEN MILE, he has a powerful screen presence.
The movie’s problem is that the filmmakers went for “pseudo-realism” in the use of drugs, alcohol and foul language but failed to go for true realism in God’s role in redemption. The money a movie makes, or loses, is profoundly impacted but its grasp of real values. Graphic use of drugs, alcohol and foul language reduce income. Clear indications that the road to redemption requires the saving grace of Jesus Christ will improve box office results.
The message of forgiveness in REDEMPTION ROAD is far better than the revenge promoted in so many movies, but it still seems like a missed opportunity. While God was honored in a few spots in the movie, He was soft-peddled in the climax.
This leads to a good question: What audience did the filmmakers think would want to pay $10 to see this movie?


In Brief:

REDEMPTION ROAD will probably not do well on the church dinner-and-a-movie circuit, but it does contain strong Christian content and a wonderful message about forgiveness. Jefferson Bailey, the son of a blues musician, drinks heavily and suffers from stage fright. He loses his day job and is threatened by a friend whose wife he has befriended too closely. At the same time, he is invited by a stranger named Augy to travel from Austin, TX to Huntsville, AL to receive an inheritance from his grandfather who recently died. He winds up leaving with Augy.
The foul language and pre-forgiven behavior in REDEMPTION ROAD is strong enough to call for extreme caution. The movie includes considerable drinking, drugs, smoking, and bad language, but it is very clear about the evils of intoxication. Much of the suffering in the movie that calls for forgiveness is the direct result of intoxication. The message of forgiveness in REDEMPTION ROAD is better than the revenge promoted in many movies, but it still seems like a missed opportunity. While God was honored in a few spots in REDEMPTION ROAD, He is soft peddled in the redemptive climax.