RIDICULE Add To My Top 10

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Release Date: November 22, 1996

Starring: Charles Berling, Jean Rochefort, Fanny Ardant, Judith Godrech , & Bernard Giraudeau

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Miramax Zoe

Director: Patrice Leconte

Executive Producer:

Producer: Gilles LeGrand & Frederic Brillion

Writer: Remi Waterhouse

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Content:

(Pa, C, L, V, SS, NN, A, M) Pagan worldview with some Christian content; 4 vulgarities & 4 profanities; mild violence including tripping, suicide by hanging & dueling with pistols scene; implied fornication & some foreplay including kissing and touching; brief but close image of male genitalia, obscured full female nudity, cleavage, & upper male nudity; alcohol use; and back-biting, insulting & ridiculing

Summary:

RIDICULE is the story of Ponceludon de Malavoy, a simple country engineer who ventures to Versailles to see King Louis XVI for a grant to drain a mosquito-infested region of France. In the King's court, Ponceludon realizes the power of a sharp and biting wit. Containing sexual situations, nudity and cruel talk, it nevertheless is a morality tale with a pagan worldview and some Christian elements.

Review:

RIDICULE is the story of Ponceludon de Malavoy, a simple country engineer who ventures to Versailles in 1783 to see the King Louis XVI for a grant to drain a mosquito-infested region of France. Ponceludon learns quickly that the tongue is mightier than the sword. Ponceludon finds a home at the benevolent Marquis de Bellegarde, a court veteran. Bellegarde trains Ponceludon to the wicked ways of the court. Ponceludon meets the recently widowed Countess of Blayac and has an affair with her so he can get access to the King. What Ponceludon doesn't take into account is his growing fascination and love for Bellegarde's daughter, Mathilde. When Ponceludon makes his intentions for Mathilde public, the Countess sets the stage to ridicule Ponceludon at the ball by tripping and unmasking him in front of the King.

There is great power in the spoken word, which the King's court understood, but when wit becomes malicious and unrelenting, the Revolution can not be far off. The King is seen to be more interested in a person's wit than in governing his country. Unkind words hurt and one should not sit in the seat of mockers. This movie has Christian references such as prayer and a kind abbot, but it also contains sexual situations, nudity and cruel talk.

In Brief: