SECRETS AND LIES Add To My Top 10

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Language        
Violence        
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Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Timothy Spall, Phyllis Logan, Brenda Blethyn, & Claire Rushbrook sp

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 140 mins.

Distributor: October Films

Director: Mike Leigh

Executive Producer:

Producer: Simon Channing-Williams

Writer: Mike Leigh

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Content:

(B, H, LL, S, A, D, M) Biblical worldview promoting commitment & speaking the truth in love; 2 profanities & 10 obscenities; implied immorality involving couple on bed in undergarments & two occasions where condom use is discussed; alcohol use and abuse; smoking; and, woman on toilet applying a tampon and person vomiting into sink

Summary:

SECRETS AND LIES promotes commitment and speaking the truth in love through the story of a young Black, English woman named Hortance who discovers her true birth mother. At first, her white mother doesn't want anything to do with her, but in time truth is revealed resulting in emotional healing for the whole family. Primarily a morality tale, it does include some obscenities and implied immorality.

Review:

SECRETS AND LIES tells the story of a young black woman named Hortance living on in London. Shortly after the death of her adoptive mother, she looks for her real mother and she finds a white, never married factory worker who lives with her daughter Roxanne. Her mother, Cynthia, at first refuses to recognize Hortance. Only Cynthia's brother, Morris, knows of Hortance. However, Hortance, quickly befriends her mother. Simultaneously, brother Morris begins to feel guilty because he has neglected Cynthia. He has a very successful business and decides to invite his sister, Cynthia, and Roxanne over for Roxanne's 21st birthday. Cynthia decides she will pass off Hortance as a co-worker from the factory. However, soon "the secret" gets out, resulting in emotional healing for the whole family.

The major theme of the movie states that all families have secrets and lies, and to persist in them does not get rid of them. When a biblical principal of speaking the truth is practiced, the result is wonderful. Not only does it talk about identity within a family, but it also addresses the question of race. Can we accept members of a different race into our own family? SECRET AND LIES suggests yes. Containing a few obscenities and some implied sexual immorality, it is a mostly moral look at commitment and speaking the truth in love.

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