VERTICAL LIMIT Add To My Top 10

Snowy Suspense

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 08, 2000

Starring: Chris O’Donnell, Bill Paxton, Robin Tunney, Nicholas Lea, & Alexander Siddig

Genre: Suspense/Drama

Audience: Teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 120 minutes

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Content:

(RoRo, BB, Ab, FRFR, LL, VV, S, N, AA, D, M) Mostly romantic worldview which characters exemplify through many emotional scenes with some moral, heroic elements, a scene where salvation by faith is questioned & man acknowledges he is going to hell & a few scenes depicting practicing Muslims; 7 obscenities, 4 exclamatory profanities, some vulgarities, & an obscene gesture; many tense life threatening scenes, such as depicted avalanches with implied deaths, man cuts rope killing self & other men in order to save others, depicted man slams against rock with depicted leg snapping after being caught between two rocks, climbers fall down hole, explosions from nitroglycerin compound, helicopter blade dangerously close to woman, scenes of characters clinging to side of mountain, many gutsy climbing moves, depicted disjointed finger with implied straightening of it (sound only), man kills man by injecting air into other man’s neck, implied taking blood out of corpse with depicted blood in bag, depicted internal injury, coughing up blood & other symptoms from edema; some references to sex; men sunbathe nude but parts are obscured; alcohol use & abuse; smoking & depicted drug injected for survival; and, revenge & selfishness.

Summary:

The risks, thrills and intensity of climbing are explored in VERTICAL LIMIT, a story about a man who risks his own life to save his sister on the toughest mountain in the world. Despite the breathtaking action sequences, this movie contains foul language, violence, murder, and euthanasia among other elements that detract from its acceptability.

Review:

Danger mixes with adrenaline in THE VERTICAL LIMIT, a suspenseful drama depicting the attempt to climb K2, the world’s second highest peak.

As a family, the Garretts often climbed together, with siblings Peter and Annie led by their experienced father. One outing, however, a couple of amateurs fall, colliding with the Garretts. With five people held onto by one cable, Peter is told by his father to cut the rope, meaning his father and the two inexperienced climbers would fall to their death, but Peter and Annie would be saved. He struggles with the decision, but despite his sister’s pleas he fulfills his father’s request.

Years later, Peter is in a more secluded role as a nature photographer for National Geographic. On assignment, he finds himself in the same area as Annie, who is a world-class mountain climber. The two haven’t spoken in a long time, mainly due to Annie’s inability to forgive her brother for sending their father to his death. Upon seeing Peter, Annie is uncomfortable, but unwilling to even discuss the matter surrounding the painful experience.

Peter learns that she is preparing to scale K2, the world’s second highest peak, in a publicity stunt with wealthy businessman Elliot Vaughn and a highly experienced climber named Tom McLaren. As the team gathers for the climb, it is soon apparent that everyone involved has different reasons for doing it.

The night before their departure, there is a huge celebration for the crew. During this celebration Montgomery Wick, a recluse who is well experienced with K2 and respected amongst climbers, appears and asks Elliot about his tactics. Elliot merely answers his questions as though at a press conference and Wick’s warning goes unheeded.

The regret comes after the team experiences an avalanche, and the base camp down below assumes the worst. However, there are three surviving members buried in a snow-covered cave: Elliot, Tom and Annie. At first, the radios are of no use, but when Peter begins using Morse code, Annie immediately recognizes it and the two communicate via the code, taught to them by their father.

Knowing their time of survival is limited, Peter organizes a team to ascend the mountain. Due to the events, however, rounding up a team proves more than difficult, especially when he realizes that they cannot make it in time. Recognizing the only one who can assist their efforts, Peter calls upon Montgomery Wick. At first he refuses, but when money is mentioned, he decides to join them. As they begin their rescue efforts, Peter must confront his own fears and risk everything for his sister.

The remarkable action sequences one would expect in VERTICAL LIMIT are present, and fairly well thought out. Despite the minute presence of a budding relationship, the story’s focus on the relationship between brother and sister is not only refreshing, but also inspiring. The characters are diverse, though some are presented in an unrealistic fashion. This movie was also slightly anti-climatic in nature, in a way that seemed to be due to a budget problem.

Though the suspense is intriguing, and even humorous at times, the situations depicted are quite intense. These life or death scenarios, along with their implied and depicted death, are disturbing. This and the movie’s use of violence, murder, euthanasia, foul language, sexual references, and other questionable elements detract from its acceptability.

In Brief:

VERTICAL LIMIT explores the risks, thrills and intensity of mountain climbing, in a story about Peter (Chris O’Donnell) who risks his own life to save his sister on K2, the second highest mountain in the world. Blamed by his sister for the death of their father when he obeyed his father to cut the rope so that he and Annie would be saved in an earlier expedition, Peter must overcome his fears in order to accomplish the rescue.

The remarkable action sequences one would expect in VERTICAL LIMIT are present. Despite the budding of a romantic relationship, the story’s focus on the relationship between brother and sister is not only refreshing, but inspiring. The characters are diverse, though some are presented in an unrealistic fashion. VERTICAL LIMIT movie was also slightly anti-climatic in nature, in a way that seemed to be due to a budget problem. Though the suspense is intriguing, and even humorous at times, the situations depicted are quite intense. These life or death scenarios, along with implied and depicted death, are disturbing. This and the movie’s use of foul language, sexual references, murder, euthanasia, violence, and other questionable elements detract from its acceptability