VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 28, 1995

Starring: Christopher Reeve, Kirstie
Alley, Linda Koslowski,
Michael Pare, & Mark Hamill

Genre: Horror

Audience:

Rating: R

Runtime: 115 minutes

Distributor: Universal Pictures

Director: John Carpenter EXECUTIVE
PRODUCERS: Ted Vernon, Shep
Gordon & Andre Blay

Executive Producer:

Producer: Michael Preger & Sandy King

Writer: John Carpenter & David
Himmelstein BASED ON THE
NOVEL: THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS by
John Wyndham

Address Comments To:

Content:

(AB, NA, O, L, VV) Anti-biblical worldview with New Age & occult elements -- alien children from another world have the power to kill people; 1 obscenity; and, brief violence -- a truck blows up.

Summary:

In his re-make of VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED, John Carpenter fails to recapture or invigorate the macabre anxiety so rampant in the original 1960 MGM-British thriller. Based on John Wyndham's novel, THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS, the movie centers upon the mysterious impregnation of certain women by an alien force during a countryside blackout. Regrettably, the acting is bland, and, while the gruesome scenes and violence are handled well, it is too bad these merits cannot save the film from being undistinguished.

Review:

In his re-make of VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED, John Carpenter fails to recapture or invigorate the macabre anxiety so rampant in the original 1960 MGM-British thriller. Based on John Wyndham's novel, THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS, the movie centers upon the mysterious impregnation of certain women by an alien force during a countryside blackout. The resulting blonde children are brilliant and deadly, possessed by an hypnotic glare which injures or kills anyone in their way. The creatures control the Midwich townspeople by clairvoyance. Finally, after much destruction, the doctor, played by Christopher Reeve, sneaks a bomb into the barn where the children are. By thinking of a brick wall, which the monsters have difficulty penetrating, Reeve is able to contain the aliens until the bomb explodes.

Regrettably, the acting is bland: Reeve and Linda Koslowski come nearest to establishing characters, while Kirstie Alley stagnates as a chain-smoking epidemiologist, relentlessly determined to study the aliens. The idyllic setting by the crashing sea will help the viewer overlook the "crashing boredom" on the screen. To Carpenter's credit, the film has no profanity, and the gruesome scenes and violence are handled well. It is too bad that these merits cannot save the film from being undistinguished. Hopefully, John Carpenter can recapture that zest and individuality of his early works again.

In Brief: