CHIPS

Content:

(PaPaPa, B, HoHo, APAP, LLL, VVV, SSS, NNN, A, DD, MMM) Very strong, slightly mixed pagan worldview condoning lawlessness and immorality with some light moral values about protecting all lives, plus multiple homosexual characters and movie shows police officers to be incompetent; extreme foul language, including at least 105 obscenities (including 65 “f” words) and 26 profanities, heavy discussion of fecal matter, and some vomiting; heavy violence includes shootings, car chases, car crashes, a man’s head is completely decapitated, and his head flies through the air, a man’s fingers are shot off quite explicitly, multiple people are killed, man jumps out of a helicopter to his death, multiple people are completely run over by cars; very strong sexual content, one brief depicted sex scene, discussion of sexting, man video chats with a naked older woman by accident, man ogles women constantly, man is addicted to sex and self-abuse, man is afraid of skin to skin contact with other man and at one point accidentally face planting his naked partner’s pelvis area while trying to help him, implied adultery, reference to sodomy, multiple homosexual characters; brief extreme frontal nudity in two scenes plus strong explicit nudity (including upper female nudity in four instances (though not in the depicted sex scene), men in underwear with lingering shots on their private parts, and women in revealing outfits; moderate drinking; no smoking but villain’s son is addicted to heroin; and, robbery, lawlessness, vengeance, and disrespect of law enforcement and authority.

Summary:

CHIPS is an action comedy inspired by the television series CHIPS which aired between 1977-1983, and starred Larry Wilcox and Erik Estrada, but in no way honors the spirit of the original show due to it’s abhorrent content. CHIPS is a poorly made, terribly vulgar and offensive movie that should be avoided at all costs.

Review:

CHIPS is an action comedy inspired by the television series CHIPS that aired between 1977 and 1983, and starred Larry Wilcox and Erik Estrada, but it in no way honors the original show’s spirit due to its abhorrent content.
Jon Baker (Dax Shepherd) is a retired motocross athlete, who joins the California Highway Patrol in an attempt to impress and win back his wife, who’s cheating on him. Incompetent in nearly everything, Jon graduates from training only because he’s extremely skilled in motorcycle driving.
Frank Poncherello (Michael Peña) is a reckless FBI agent from Miami who’s assigned to go undercover into the CHP to find out which officers are behind a recent string of armored car robberies. Frank is partnered up with the rookie, Jon, who arrogantly rubs everyone in the precinct the wrong way, including Frank. Frank, however, has his own issues, particularly his sex addiction, over which he shows no control whatsoever.
As the two officers butt heads, with Frank trying to investigate who the dirty cops are, and Jon going overboard in giving people tickets, they very slowly and painfully learn to appreciate each other and learn from one another.
CHIPS is so poorly written and directed, that it’s hard to find anything positive or redeeming to say. The plot runs all over the place, the dialogue is both flat and at times confusing, and in some cases, it seems as if they literally forgot to edit out mistakes that the actors made while filming. The jokes are almost always overtly sexual, lewd and offensive, and rarely funny. The only real funny moment is a scene involving actress Maya Rudolph, and it’s extremely short. Additionally, the villains lack proper motives, and their identities are revealed at the beginning, taking away any mystery they had.
There’s a light moral message that police officers are supposed to save someone if they can, even if it’s an awful person. Also, Jon shows a commendable amount of loyalty to his cheating wife, even though his fidelity is somewhat mocked. This, however, is practically unnoticeable because it’s surrounded by a constant barrage of incredibly vulgar content.
All in all, what makes the movie worse of all is its blatant disrespect of law enforcement. It’s one thing to portray the police officers as utterly vulgar, or some as villains. It’s another thing to portray the whole department as bumbling idiots. In the end, CHIPS is abhorrent and not worth the ticket.

In Brief:

CHIPS is an action comedy inspired by the television series CHIPS that aired between 1977 and 1983. However, it in no way honors the original show’s spirit because of its abhorrent content. Jon, a retired motocross athlete, somehow is accepted to be a California Highway Patrol officer regardless of his incompetence in everything. He’s partnered with Frank, an undercover FBI agent with a sex addiction who’s investigating the dirty cops behind a recent string of armored car robberies. As the two officers butt heads, they slowly and painfully learn to appreciate each other and learn from one another. CHIPS is so poorly written and directed, that it’s hard to find anything positive or redeeming to say. The plot runs all over the place, the dialogue is both flat and at times confusing, and in some cases, it seems as if they literally forgot to edit out mistakes the actors made while filming. There’s a light moral message in the movie, but it’s practically unnoticeable due to a constant barrage of incredibly vulgar content. Also, this CHIPS portrays the police as bumbling idiots.