ANDRE

Content +1
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 19, 1994

Starring: Keith Carradine, Tina
Majorino, Keith Szarabajk,
Chelsea Field, Joshua Jackson,
Shane Meier, & Aidan Pendleton

Genre: Drama

Audience: Family

Rating: PG

Runtime: 93 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Director:

Executive Producer:

Producer:

Writer: Dana Baratta BASED ON THE
BOOK: A SEAL CALLED ANDRE by
Harry Goodridge & Lew Dietz

Address Comments To:

Content:

(B, L, V, A, M) Biblical worldview with theme of setting something or someone free if you love them; 8 mild obscenities; brief fist-fight; alcohol abuse; cigarette smoking by minors (not condoned); and, numerous instances of scatological humor.

Summary:

ANDRE is the story of a seal pup adopted and raised by a family in the small fishing village of Rockport, Maine, in 1962. With some scatological humor and some mildly objectionable language, this somewhat corny and simplistic movie is nonetheless an enjoyable outing for children and adults alike. Plus, the acting of the seal is remarkable!

Review:

ANDRE is the true story of a summer in 1962 and the years following as 9-year-old Toni Whitney and her father, Harry, take in a seal pup and raise it to maturity. Andre becomes part of the Whitney family, so much so that he acts almost human. Toni becomes particularly attached to Andre, and her only friends seem to be the menagerie of animals that her father has adopted. Harry is so fascinated by the seal that he soon begins to neglect the emotional needs of his family and the responsibilities of his job as Harbor Master in the fishing town of Rockport, Maine. Andre becomes nationally admired, but it becomes apparent that he is not suited to the harsh winters of Maine. The issue is one of how to best care for him in the most humane way.

ANDRE is a corny but endearing movie, and by film's end the viewer will forgive the movie for going over the top in sap. There is a fair amount of scatological humor and some mildly offensive language, but, overall, children and adults alike will love this touching and remarkable story. It is almost void of environmental preaching and is a wonderful story of the love and devotion. The film's message is one we must all learn: if you love something, let it go; if it comes back, it is yours.

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