ARCTIC TALE Add To My Top 10

Controversial Conclusions

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: July 25, 2007

Starring: The voice of Queen Latifah as “The Storyteller”

Genre: Animal Adventure Drama

Audience: All ages

Rating: PG

Runtime: 96 minutes

Address Comments To:

Sumner Redstone
Chairman/CEO
Viacom
John Lesher
President
Paramount Vantage
(Paramount Classics)
A Division of Paramount Pictures
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier Building
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Phone: (323) 956-2000
Fax: (323) 862-1212
Website: www.paramountclassics.com

Content:

(H, EEE, V, S, M) Light humanist worldview with very strong environmentalist content supporting dubious “global warming” issues and solutions, especially at the end where children are used for dubious propaganda purposes; no foul language; some mild scenes of predatory animals hunting other animals and animals eating captured prey; some light references to animal mating and birthing; no nudity; no alcohol; no smoking; and, movie deliberately, and in a strange way, focuses on female animals and presents mostly negative depictions of male animals, who mostly occupy mating roles, which possibly encourages some kind of obtuse, bizarre feminist agenda.

Summary:

RCTIC TALE appears at first blush to be a classic wilderness adventure drama similar to the ones produced in the 1950s and 60s, but its ending uses innocent, naïve children to make biased statements about man-made global warming theories and solutions. The story focuses on a polar bear cub and a walrus pup facing challenges because of shrinking ice flows near the North Pole.

Review:

ARCTIC TALE is a wilderness adventure drama similar to the ones Walt Disney used to make in the 1950s and 60s, but it has a global warming agenda that turns the ending into a kind of Michael Moore propaganda movie for children, without, however, Moore’s positive references to the “glories” of Communism and socialism. Even the left-leaning Los Angeles Times has taken the movie to task for its propagandistic approach.

Narrated by Queen Latifah, who is billed as the Storyteller, the movie tells about a young polar bear and a young walrus living in the Arctic wilderness. Named Nanu and Seela, respectively, the two animals struggle to survive in a changing environment where the ice flows they depend on are vanishing. They both seek refuge a week’s swim away on a distant island, where survival is tough and dangerous for both of them. Nanu risks starvation, and Seela risks getting eaten by one of Nanu’s fellow polar bears.

ARCTIC TALE is a dramatic and riveting movie for families. The movie’s premise is that the shrinking ice flows around the North Pole endanger the species living there. However, the filmmakers link this problem (which apparently has been well established) to man-made global warming (which is not so well established). Making matters worse, the movie’s ending puts global warming propaganda into the mouths of children, who are not trained scientists. One child encourages young moviegoers to ask their teachers about global warming. This shows how the environmentalists have made global warming a propaganda issue rather than a scientific one. If it is inappropriate for teachers to take positions on other issues of faith and values, then it is inappropriate for the average teacher, especially teachers in government-run and government-licensed schools, to take a stand on such controversial issues that also require a leap of faith. Instead of encouraging children to discuss such issues with teachers and to support dubious solutions like give up all family SUVs, we should encourage children and their parents to make an effort themselves to look at all the scientific evidence for and against global warming theories and solutions and make up their own minds. Much of the global warming panic comes from politicians and environmentalists with an agenda, who get money for taking stands in favor of man-made global warming.

There is no foul language in ARCTIC TALE. There are some very mild references to animal mating and reproduction and some mild scenes of animals eating raw flesh. Finally, the movie is focused on female animals, so there are no scenes of male/female parenting for children and families to model their lives upon, like in MARCH OF THE PENGUINS, which is a much better movie.

In Brief:

ARCTIC TALE appears at first blush to be a classic wilderness movie similar to those produced in the 1950s. Narrated by Queen Latifah as the Storyteller, the story tells about a young polar bear and a young walrus living in the Arctic near the North Pole. Named Nanu and Seela, respectively, the two animals struggle to survive in a changing environment where the ice flows are vanishing. They both seek refuge a week’s swim away on a distant island, where survival is tough and dangerous for both of them. Nanu risks starvation, and Seela risks getting eaten by one of Nanu’s fellow polar bears.

ARCTIC TALE is a dramatic, riveting movie for families. The movie’s premise is that the shrinking ice flows on the North Pole endanger the species living there. The filmmakers link this problem (which has been well established) to man-made global warming (which is not so well documented). Making matters worse, the movie’s ending puts global warming propaganda into the mouths of innocent children, who are not trained scientists. There is no foul language and only mild references to animal mating and violent eating habits.