BEYOND THE GATES

Courageous Faith in the Killing Fields

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: March 09, 2007

Starring: John Hurt, Hugh Dancy and Clare-Hope Ashitey

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 110 minutes

Distributor: IFC Films

Director: Michael Caton-Jones

Executive Producer: None

Producer: David Belton, Pippa Cross and Jens Meurer

Writer: David Wolstencroft

Address Comments To:

Joshua Sapan, President/CEO
IFC Films/IFC Entertainment
Rainbow Media Holdings, Inc.
(Independent Movie Channel/IFC Films/Bravo Networks)
200 Jericho Quadrangle
Jericho, NY 11753
Phone: (516) 803-3000
Fax: (516) 803-4616
Website: www.ifctv.com

Content:

(CCC, BBB, H, LL, VVV, N, A, D, MM) Extremely Christian worldview with a Catholic priest explaining the faith, expounding on the Resurrection, clarifying the Eucharist, and eventually dying for Jesus Christ, plus one moment during a siege of a Catholic school where the question is asked, “Where is God," by one of the teachers and another moment where the priest erupts in anger at the killing fields; 13 obscenities, many of which are "f" words," two Oh, my God type profanities; extreme violence showing a decapitated body, mobs of Hutus slashing women and children and men with machetes, pointblank shootings, beatings, many images of dead bodies, priest delivers baby in crowded room, and scenes of dogs eating dead bodies, but no first-hand, Hollywood glamorization of violence; no sex; very minor naturalistic nudity of children; light drinking; smoking; and, extreme racism, deception and heinous government officials.

Summary:

BEYOND THE GATES tells the story of the Rwanda genocide in 1994 when the Hutus killed over 800,000 Tutsis in cold blood. It focuses on a Catholic school and its priest, Father Christopher, who are surrounded by bloodthirsty Hutus. BEYOND THE GATES is mesmerizing and has an extremely strong Christian worldview, but it is difficult to watch and contains some strong foul language and overly graphic violence.

Review:

BEYOND THE GATES starts off with a quote about finding the key to Heaven, which the quote notes is also the key to Hell. Then, it proceeds to tell the story of the Rwanda genocide in 1994 when the Hutus killed over 800,000 Tutsis in cold blood.

This powerful and emotionally nerve-wracking movie opens up at a Catholic school in the capital of Rwanda. Joe, a young British teacher, is full of enthusiasm. Father Christopher is a man of strong faith who has seen too often the fallenness of man.

Within a very short period of time, the world around the school starts to fall apart. The United Nations monitoring troops station themselves at the school. When the Hutu president's plane crashes, the Hutus go on a warpath against the Tutsis. Many Europeans and Tutsis take refuge in the school. The Hutus surround them with clubs and machetes.

Each foray into the town in the school truck by Joe or Father Christopher gets increasingly perilous. At one point, Joe, who does not go to mass, questions the existence of God. Father Christopher explains the faith in the resurrection of Jesus in a clear, biblical, almost evangelical fashion. His best and brightest students have accepted Jesus Christ. He continues to hold church services because he believes that faith is more important than works, but by his faith he shows forth his works.

When the U.N. clears out with the Europeans, Joe abandons the school, but Father Christopher stays with the flock. Years later, one young black girl who survives finds Joe at a posh school in Europe and asks him how he could have left.

There are many stories about Father Christopher. In the movie, he is very human at times. He curses the U.N. for allowing the genocide. He confronts the Hutus with love and a stern warning. This is not a movie about the Resurrection. It doesn't have a feel-good ending. It's a movie about Christ and bearing each other's burdens, willing to die for your enemies and your friends. It is one of the most difficult movies ever made to watch.

The movie could be highly recommended were it not for some of the foul language, most of it by a BBC crew. There's a clear distinction between the people of faith and the pagans, except at the point Father Christopher loses his temper at the UN officer.

Watching BEYOND THE GATES is more like watching a documentary. It has a you-are-there feel. It is also intensely emotional. The acting and the music serve the story.

The filmmakers are to be commended, but it would have been nice if they opened up the movie to a broader audience by being slightly more restrained. In this regard, HOTEL RWANDA, which is not as Christian, serves a broader audience and makes many of the same points about the Rwanda genocide.

In Brief:

BEYOND THE GATES tells about the Rwanda genocide in 1994 when the Hutus killed over 800,000 Tutsis in cold blood. This powerful and emotionally nerve-wracking movie opens up at a Catholic school in the capital of Rwanda. Joe, a young British teacher, is full of enthusiasm. Father Christopher is a man of strong faith who has seen the fallenness of man too often. Within a short period of time, the world around the school starts to fall apart. The United Nations monitoring troops station themselves at the school. When the Hutu president's plane crashes, the Hutus go on a warpath against the Tutsis, and many Europeans and Tutsis take refuge in the school.

BEYOND THE GATES is mesmerizing but difficult to watch. It has an extremely strong Christian worldview. Father Christopher explains the faith in the resurrection of Jesus in a clear, biblical fashion. He continues to hold church services because he believes that faith is more important than works, but by his faith he shows his works. The filmmakers should be commended, but it would have been nice if they had left out the foul language and more graphic violence.