SHINE A LIGHT

Hiding Your Light

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 04, 2008

Starring: The Rolling Stones

Genre: Concert Documentary

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 121 minutes

Distributor: Paramount Vantage/Viacom

Director: Martin Scorsese

Executive Producer: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards,
Charlie Watts, and Ron Wood

Producer: Victoria Pearman, Michael
Cohl, Zane Weiner, and Steve
Bing

Writer: Mick Jagger and Keith Richards

Address Comments To:

Sumner Redstone, Chairman/CEO, Viacom
John Lesher, President, Paramount Vantage
(aka Paramount Classics)
A Division of Paramount Pictures
5555 Melrose Avenue
Chevalier Building
Los Angeles, CA 90038
Phone: (323) 956-2000; Fax: (323) 862-1212
Website: www.paramountclassics.com

Content:

(PaPa, C, B, L, S, N, A, DD, M) Strong pagan worldview with a brief Gospel reference to the Lord in one song; seven or eight obscenities and one light profanity; no violence; light references to sex and some euphemistic double entendres in song lyrics; partial upper male nudity; alcohol references in at least one song; smoking, positive marijuana references in one song and references to past drug busts of Rolling Stones band members; and, some hedonistic, controversial song lyrics and President Bill Clinton introduces the band.

Summary:

SHINE A LIGHT is a concert movie of the Rolling Stones directed by Martin Scorsese that features many of the band’s best-known songs as well as some old documentary interviews of the members in their younger days. SHINE A LIGHT is well made, but it contains brief foul language, some sexual innuendoes and positive references to smoking marijuana in one song.

Review:

The title of this concert movie of the Rolling Stones, directed by acclaimed director Martin Scorsese, refers to the title of a great Gospel tune written by, of all people, Mick Jagger. But, Scorsese only uses the great Gospel chorus of that song, “May the good Lord shine a light on you,” briefly during the end credits. This is one of the biggest missed opportunities ever made by a filmmaker anywhere in any time and any place. Why make a religious reference in the title of your movie if you’re not even going to use the reference until a credit sequence? And, even if the reference was not religious, why refer to something in your title that doesn’t even show up until the end credits, and then only briefly? In effect, instead of actually shining a light (as the title of his movie suggests), Scorsese has effectively hidden the light! This is inherently self-contradictory, but what can you expect from the man who made one of the most stupid, and offensive, movies of all time, THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST?

Of course, many of the songs by the Rolling Stones deal with romance and sex, and a couple songs are notorious for their references to drugs or Satan (e.g., “Sympathy for the Devil”). Thus, a concert by the Stones is not going to be filled with a moral or biblical outlook on life.

In filming this concert, which took place in New York City, Scorsese intersperses the band’s songs with past interviews of the band members. In several interviews, Mick Jagger notes that he tries to stay away from political or religious issues and controversies. Also, in one early interview during one of the band’s first tours in America, Jagger says the band probably will be touring for only a couple more years. In another interview shot a bit later, however, Jagger says he can see himself singing on stage when he is 60. Obviously, the latter statement has turned out to be prophetic.

The concert itself features many of the band’s most famous songs, plus three duets with other artists, such as Christina Aguilera and blues singer Buddy Guy. It ends with two of the band’s most popular signature songs, “Brown Sugar” and “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.”

Once again, Mick Jagger shows he still has boundless energy on stage. Though the earlier songs in the concert show some age in his voice, this is not true during the last two songs mentioned above. As noted, viewers get to hear the positive Gospel refrain of the song “Shine a Light,” but the rest of the movie reflects the band’s basic pagan outlook. Also, a few “f” words are said and one song contains positive references to smoking marijuana. Thus, MOVIEGUIDE® advises extreme caution.

Strangely, on a side note, Jagger leaves out the lyrics about killing the Kennedy brothers, JFK and Robert, in the song “Sympathy for the Devil.” That includes the metaphysical lyrics laying metaphysical blame for their deaths on “you and me,” as the original lyrics state. No explanation is given for this interesting and strange omission.

In Brief:

SHINE A LIGHT is a concert movie of the Rolling Stones performing in New York City, directed by acclaimed director Martin Scorsese. Scorsese intersperses the band’s songs with past interviews of the band members. The concert features many of the band’s most famous songs, plus three duets with other artists, such as Christina Aguilera and blues singer Buddy Guy. It ends with two of the band’s most popular signature songs, “Brown Sugar” and “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.”

The title of this concert movie refers to the title of a great Gospel tune written by Stones lead singer Mick Jagger. Scorsese only uses the great Gospel chorus of that song, “May the good Lord shine a light on you,” briefly during the end credits. The rest of the movie features the Stones pagan worldview of romance and sex. Once again, Mick Jagger shows he still has boundless energy on stage. Though the earlier songs in the concert show some age in his voice, this is not true during “Brown Sugar” and “Satisfaction.” SHINE A LIGHT contains brief foul language, some sexual innuendoes and positive references to smoking marijuana in one song.