BLUE CRUSH

Big Waves and Hot Bodies

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: August 16, 2002

Starring: Kate Bosworth, Michelle
Rodriguez, Matthew Davis,
Sanoe Lake, Mika Boorem, and
Faizon Love

Genre: Surf Sports/Romance

Audience: Teenage girls

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 104 minutes

Distributor: Universal

Director: John Stockwell

Executive Producer: Buffy Shutt, Kathy Jones,
Louis G. Friedman

Producer: Brian Grazer and Karen Kehela

Writer: Lizzy Weiss, Kario Salem and
John Stockwell

Address Comments To:

Stacy Snider, Chairman
Universal Pictures
Ron Meyer, President, COO
Universal Studios
100 Universal City Plaza
Universal City, CA 91608-1085
Phone: (818) 777-1000
Web Page: www.universalstudios.com

Content:

(RoRo, H, LLL, V, S, N, A, D, M) Strong Romantic worldview where everyone is basically a “good person” and are a product of the culture, humanist elements where characters rely only on themselves for help, with hedonistic elements such as grinding at a party and substance misuse; 40 obscenities (mostly sh-!), 11 profanities, a handful of vulgarities, with a lot of heated arguments among the characters, man flips the middle finger, a couple shots of vomit and excrement; violence is mostly surfers being beaten up by the waves, with minimal wounds shown, girl remembers near drowning experience, one fist fight among surfers, and one fight with older and younger sister; scene of implied fornication, with a fair amount of innuendo and images of used condom that sticks to girl’s shoe; rear female nudity with shower scene (with strategically placed fog), one near shot of female private parts with camera shot under bathroom stall (but nothing explicit), upper male nudity, and bikini clad women; alcohol use and smoking at a wild party; and, lying and discrimination of island natives toward mainlanders.


Summary:

BLUE CRUSH tells the story of Anne Marie (Kate Bosworth), a surfer girl who is training for the surfing contest held off the coast of Oahu with her friends Eden (Michelle Rodriguez) and Lena (Sanoe Lake). With fantastic, colorful shots, BLUE CRUSH also has its share of foul language and images involving implied fornication that deserve an extreme caution.


Review:

BLUE CRUSH opens with Anne Marie (played by Kate Bosworth) training for the big surf contest on Oahu. She lives with her friends, Eden and Lena (Michelle Rodriguez and Sanoe Lake, respectively) and her younger sister Penny, played by Mika Boorem.
As the contest approaches, Anne Marie continues to struggle with her near fatal drowning accident three years earlier at the junior surf competition held on the same stretch of beach. The memory becomes a place of residence rather than a point of reference, and while she does other training, this greatly inhibits her from testing out the larger waves, the necessary training ground for the contest.
With her mother just up and leaving the family, and no father to be seen, the responsibility of raising Penny falls on the shoulders of Anne Marie, who herself still struggles to find her own identity. Even with the combined incomes of Eden, Lena and Anne Marie, who work as hotel maids by day, the girls still have problems meeting the rent and trying to make a living.
After an incident at the hotel, Anne Marie gets the pink slip and hits the beach to train some more. It is here she first meets Matt (Matthew Davis), a vacationing NFL quarterback. He approaches her and asks if she gives surf lessons (read: he wants to get to know her better), but she brushes him, seeing him as just some schmo. After her friends tell her that she could make money teaching him, the gang of girls catch up to him and tell him they will teach him and his friends.
With surf lessons going swimmingly, Matt and Anne Marie begin to grow very fond of each other, and she begins to see a good excuse (subconsciously) to not worry about the impending contest. As tensions mount between her and her friends and her sister, Anne Marie must make a decision whether to face her fears or to run away from them.
BLUE CRUSH uses vivid colors and beautiful scenery to create a visually pleasant backdrop for the movie. The style of filming makes for a great break from the very common gray tones and filters that many filmmakers use on their films today.
The storyline unfolds slowly, but meets a good and realistic end. As far as content is concerned, the female characters do swear a good deal. While some of the swearing may be considered realistic in some of the scenes, the movie could have reached a broader audience with fewer obscenities.
The Romantic worldview strongly appears throughout the movie, where all the characters see themselves as “good people,” and the problems they deal with are a product of the culture and circumstance. There are some undercurrents of strong friendship, but all the girls do what they want to do, and seem to be only bound in friendship by their common love: surfing.
The skin that is shown mostly comes from shots of the beach, where people do wear less clothing. A positive element to this movie is that the girls are not the stereotypical Barbie types that you would see in BAYWATCH, rather, their figures are more realistic, and lean more towards the sporty side as opposed to the bimbo side. Young girls should not walk out of this movie with an inferiority complex, but hopefully, feel that they do not need to look like a magazine cover to be happy and accepted. In fact, the only women with the BAYWATCH look are the wives of the football players, who are portrayed as shallow and mean.
BLUE CRUSH is one of the better summer fun movies to grace the screen in a while, but viewers should exercise extreme caution due to the obscenities and images of implied fornication.


In Brief:

BLUE CRUSH tells the story of Anne Marie (played by Kate Bosworth), who is training for the surf contest in Oahu. with her friends Eden (Michelle Rodriguez) and Lena (Sanoe Lake). As the contest approaches, Anne Marie struggle with the memory of her near drowning accident three years earlier at the junior surf competition held on the same stretch of beach. With her mother up and leaving the family, and no father to be seen, the responsibility of raising younger sister Penny (played by Mika Boorem) falls on the shoulders of Anne Marie, who herself still struggles to find her own identity. After Anne Marie gets the pink slip from her job, she meets Matt (Matthew Davis), a vacationing NFL quarterback, who wants to take surf lessons from her, and a romance is born.
The story unfolds slowly, but meets a good and realistic end. With fantastic, colorful shots, BLUE CRUSH also has its share of foul language, earning it a solid PG-13 rating. BLUE CRUSH is one of the better summer teen movies to grace the screen, but viewers should exercise extreme caution due to the obscenities and images of implied fornication