CORKY ROMANO Add To My Top 10

Quirky, Corny, Comical

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: October 12, 2001

Starring: Chris Kattan, Vinessa Shaw, Peter Falk, Peter Berg, Richard Roundtree, Fred Ward, & Chris Penn

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers & adults

Rating: PG-13 (for drug & sex-related
humor & language)

Runtime: 86 minutes

Address Comments To:

Michael Eisner, Chairman/CEO
The Walt Disney Company
(Buena Vista, Caravan, Hollywood, Miramax, & Touchstone Pictures)
Dick Cook
Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
(818) 560-1000

Content:

(Ro, Pa, PC, Ho, LLL, VV, S, DD, M) Romantic worldview with pagan elements including relativistic choices & emotionally-based decisions throughout, plus a fair amount of politically-correct humor regarding homosexuality; 22 obscenities, 4 profanities & some body humor; much slapstick violence including pratfalls & a torture scene with skinheads intended for humor, but somewhat disturbing, nonetheless; no overt sex depicted, but protagonist falls down on beautiful nurse, implying intention to fornicate, plus many homosexual references & puns & protagonist’s brother is a closet homosexual; no nudity; no alcohol use; drug humor in one sequence where klutzy FBI man spills cocaine all over himself & police dog; and, lying, stealing, blackmail, & Mafia corruption.

Summary:

Chris Kattan of TV’s SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE plays the title role in CORKY ROMANO, wherein Corky infiltrates the FBI to steal incriminating information about his mobster family. Though the movie is funny and Kattan’s physical humor is outstanding, moviegoers should exercise extreme caution, mostly because of the movie’s foul language, body humor and some homosexual humor.

Review:

Happy-go-lucky, but klutzy veterinarian assistant Corky Romano (Chris Kattan) is shocked when he receives a call from his long-lost father, “Pops,” (Peter Falk), an underworld crime lord who has been indicted by a Grand Jury. With his trial just weeks away, it looks as if the Mafia kingpin is finally going to be put away forever. However, Pops has a plan. He knows that the one person who can clear the family – by infiltrating the FBI and stealing the evidence against them – is Corky.

Though banished from the family at a young age, Corky is thrilled to help out and get back in the family’s good graces. He and his brothers intimidate a computer hacker into falsifying a resume to get Corky into the FBI. Out of spite, perhaps, the hacker goes overboard and makes Corky appear to be a super agent, a reputation to which the untrained, clown-like Corky must now live up.

Now named Agent Pissant (pronounced pee-SONT; “It’s French!”), he inserts himself into the inner core of the top FBI ranks and tries to fake his way through a series of tough assignments while hunting for the incriminating Romano file. As investigators close in on the Romano family, the disguised Corky gets caught in their drag net. Corky, however, has set up a sting of his own and, in the process, gains the knowledge of who he really is and the confidence to assert himself into his true place in the family.

This movie is very funny and has a hilarious opening scene at Corky’s veterinarian hospital. A giant, fat cat named “Baby Jesus” must be “put down,” but Corky’s tender heart will not allow it, and, in his nervousness, he makes a royal mess of the place. Animals and instruments fly everywhere! Corky also wears a microphone in his pants, so throughout the film, he is always leaning over and whispering into his crotch. He looks extremely out of place as he pretends to be a skinhead and make a drug deal with the “real deal,” and the physical humor Kattan displays is on par with Steve Martin and Rowan Atkinson, “Mr. Bean.” Another hilarious scene is where Corky’s Mafia brother is substituting for Corky at the vet hospital.

Regrettably, there are a number of offensive references to bodily functions, and the language is excessive for this kind of light comedy. There are also many references to (and nods to) homosexual behavior, though nothing is overtly depicted.

As with many other films out right now, like HEARTS IN ATLANTIS and LIFE AS A HOUSE, this movie demonstrates the principle that children need affirmation from their fathers. Though Corky thought he had been banished from his family for not fitting, his father finally tells him that he had sent him away because he loved him and knew his son was cut out for something better. Near the end, he says, “You are part of the family. You’re my son!”

Moviegoers should exercise extreme caution, however, mostly because of the movie’s foul language, body humor and some politically correct homosexual humor.

In Brief:

In the comedy CORKY ROMANO, happy-go-lucky, klutzy veterinarian Corky Romano (Chris Kattan) is shocked when he receives a call from his long-lost father, “Pops,” an underworld crime lord who has been indicted by a Grand Jury. With his trial just weeks away, it looks as he is finally going to be put away forever. Pops thinks the one person who can clear the family – by infiltrating the FBI and stealing the evidence against them – is Corky. Corky and his brothers intimidate a computer hacker into falsifying a resume to get him into the FBI, but the hacker goes overboard and makes Corky a super agent, a reputation to which the untrained, clown-like Corky must live up. Corky tries to fake his way through a series of FBI assignments while hunting for the incriminating files. As investigators close in on the Romanos, Corky sets up a sting of his own, however, and, in the process, gains the confidence to assert himself into his true place in the family.

Though CORKY ROMANO is funny, and Kattan’s physical humor is outstanding, moviegoers should exercise extreme caution, mostly because of the movie’s foul language, body humor and some homosexual humor.