FAMILY TREE

Training Up the Unabomber in the Way He Should Go

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Starring: Robert Forster, Naomi Judd,
Andy Lawrence, Matt Lawrence,
& Cliff Robertson

Genre: Environmental Drama

Audience: All ages

Rating: G

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Independent Artists

Director: Duane Clark

Executive Producer: Clifford Werber & Quinn
Coleman

Producer: Mike Curb & Carole Curb Nemoy

Writer: Paul Canterna

Address Comments To:

Independent Artists
1800 North Highland Ave.
Suite 311
Hollywood, CA 90028
(323) 461-3936

Content:

(EEE, Acap, Pa, V, MMM) Strong environmental worldview with touches of Gaia worship & anti-capitalist & anti-biblical elements; 1 obscenity & 1 profanity; no overt violence but elderly man gets caught in violent thunderstorm & dies the next day; no sex; no nudity; and, boy rebels against father, boy talks to tree & protest stops development of plastics plant in impoverished needy town.

Summary:

In FAMILY TREE, a young boy rebels against his honorable father to save an oak tree. False environmental messages and the boy’s rebellion fatally torpedo the G-rating in this misguided family movie.

Review:

FAMILY TREE is a perfect example of a totally unacceptable G-rated movie. Not only is it heavy, blatant propaganda which very few moral parents would want their children to see, but it also endorses a young boy rebelling against his father (who is very nice, by the way), for no coherent reason.

The movie opens with a voiceover by a teenage boy named Mark, who is discussing the exploits of his younger brother, Mitch, otherwise known as “Mess.” In this typical family movie set up, Mark is the star in the family. He does well in football and is the apple of his father’s eye. Mess of course feels left out and finds solace in talking to an old oak tree. Their town, Wagstaff, lost its only factory several years ago, and now the residents are barely surviving. To try to get the town back on its feet, Mess’ father, Henry, has worked out a very good deal to develop a piece of property for a plastics factory. Regrettably, this means that the old oak tree must be cut down.

Mess sets out to save the oak tree. At first, it looks like no one wants to join him in this crusade, because everyone needs work. Eventually, former football star and town hero, Larry, played by Cliff Robertson, joins in Mess’ protest. Of course, Mess fails to notice that his actions will keep the town impoverished and are destroying his father. Henry, meanwhile, tries to reason with Mess and with the plastic company. If the movie were not so biased, he would be the quintessential good guy.

After a violent thunderstorm, Larry dies. In honor of Larry, and forgetting that they don’t have any money or resources, the townspeople join in Mess’ protest. Therefore, his protest succeeds, but a trick ending solves the important plot problems.

FAMILY TREE is so tendentious, that my children were groaning all the way through it. Having worked in environmental law, I must admit that I was totally offended by the lack of wit, wisdom and reason in this movie. What’s worse than the high-handed environmental message, is the fact that Mess gets away with blatant rebellion. The question arises, is this the way the Unabomber was raised?

It should be noted that there are 140-160 million MORE acres of forest in the US today than in 1900. Thus, large portions of the country have been re-forested. Testing on the windward side of the US, on the Pacific coast, and then on the downwind side, on the Atlantic coast, shows that we are now one of the few countries in the world where the air gets better by passing over our country (carbon decreases, oxygen increase, etc.). Thus, FAMILY TREE is based on misconceptions and lies.

There will be those who endorse this movie because of its G-rating, but regrettably, they’re confusing a lack of semantic elements (foul language, sex and violence) with a much deeper philosophic evil.

In Brief:

FAMILY TREE is a perfect example of a totally unacceptable G-rated movie. In a small impoverished town, a young boy’s father works out a very good deal to develop a piece of property for a plastics factory. Regrettably, this means that a beloved old oak tree must be cut down. The boy sets out to save the oak tree. At first, it looks like no one wants to join him in his crusade, because everyone needs work. Eventually, his protest succeeds, but a trick ending solves the important plot problems.

The environmental message of FAMILY TREE is so tendentious, that my children groaned all the way through it. What’s worse than the high-handed environmental message, is the fact that Mess gets away with blatant rebellion against his father. The question arises, is this the way the Unabomber was raised? In reality, America’s forests are much larger than they were at the beginning of the 1900s. Thus, FAMILY TREE is based on misconceptions and lies. There will be those who endorse this movie because of its G-rating, but regrettably, they are confusing a lack of semantic elements (foul language, sex and violence) with a much deeper philosophic evil