FUNNY HA HA Add To My Top 10

Lackluster People in a Lackluster Story

Content -2
Quality
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Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 29, 2005

Starring: Kate Dollenmayer, Christian Rudder, Andrew Bujalski, Jennifer Schaper, and Myles Paige

Genre: Drama

Audience: Older teenagers and young
adults

Rating: Not Rated by MPAA

Runtime: 90 minutes

Distributor: Goodbye Cruel Releasing

Director: Andrew Bujalski

Executive Producer:

Producer: Ethan Vogt

Writer: Andrew Bujalski

Address Comments To:

No address available yet.
Website: www.funnyhahafilm.com

Content:

(Pa, Ro, LLL, V, S, AA, D, M) Pagan worldview with some moral elements, such as young heroine decides to quit drinking alcohol and she rejects awkward romantic entreaties from married man; 34 mostly strong obscenities, one strong profanity and four light profanities; man throws beer bottle off balcony in frustration; no sex scenes but some kissing, man tries to cheat on live-in girlfriend and recently married man awkwardly tries to hook up with woman he had rejected, but woman refuses now that he’s married; no nudity, but woman in bra in one scene; alcohol use, drunkenness and protagonist takes car keys away from very drunk friend; smoking; and, cheating, aimlessness and a sad view of young slackers with college degrees.

Summary:

FUNNY HA HA is a low-budget American independent movie about a young post-graduate in Boston, Marnie, who fights off her alcoholic stupor but struggles to find lasting, profound relationships with her friends. Despite some positive elements, there’s not much of a story in this boring movie, which contains strong foul language.

Review:

FUNNY HA HA is a low-budget American independent movie about a young post-graduate in Boston, Marnie, who fights off her alcoholic stupor but struggles to find lasting, profound relationships with her friends. The problem is, all of her friends, and Marnie as well, have trouble communicating with one another and expressing their feelings.

After several embarrassing moments caused by drinking alcohol, Marnie decides to lay off booze. She tries to get romantic with her friend Alex, but he keeps shooting her down, even though he just broke up with his girlfriend.

Suddenly, on what seems like a whim, Alex and his ex-girlfriend get married, but the marriage apparently doesn’t click. Despite his recent marriage, Alex awkwardly tries to become the boyfriend Marnie wanted him to be, but she turns him down, finally seeing how superficial and unreliable his character is.

There’s not much of a story in FUNNY HA HA. There are some funny scenes and positive elements, but most of the dialogue and situations are pretty boring, because the director apparently wanted to show how aimless, strange, lackluster, and alienated the lives of many young American graduates have become. Despite what some critics have said, this does not make for a compelling movie. Unrated by the MPAA, FUNNY HA HA has some R-rated foul language, but no sex scenes or graphic violence. At least the heroine quits drinking alcohol and rejects the romantic entreaties from her married friend.

It is worthwhile to note that none of the sad young people in this movie have any religious faith, much less a Christian one. Furthermore, none of them seem to have any ambition to create a family with children. The writer/director never stops to wonder if these deficiencies aren’t the reason why the lives of many college graduates are so empty and aimless. Academia’s hatred of religion and traditional family values is the problem. Unfortunately, too many of the leaders in the mass media have graduated from the colleges that teach such bigotry to America’s young people. Ironically, in FUNNY HA HA, the heroine starts working as a researcher for a professor in a college religion department, but other than that, the movie contains no references to religion.

In Brief:

FUNNY HA HA is a low-budget American movie about a post-graduate in Boston, Marnie, who fights off her alcoholic stupor but struggles to find lasting, profound relationships with her friends. All of her friends, and Marnie as well, have trouble communicating and expressing their feelings. After several embarrassing moments caused by alcohol, Marnie decides to lay off booze. She tries to get romantic with her friend Alex, but he keeps shooting her down, even though he just broke up with his girlfriend. Suddenly, on a whim, Alex and his ex-girlfriend marry, but the marriage apparently doesn’t click. In fact, Alex awkwardly tries to become the boyfriend Marnie wanted him to be, but she turns him down, finally seeing how superficial and unreliable he is.

There’s not much of a story in FUNNY HA HA. Despite some funny scenes and positive elements, most of the dialogue and situations are pretty boring, because the director apparently wants to show how aimless, strange, lackluster, and alienated the lives of many young American graduates have become. This does not make for a compelling movie, however. Unrated by the MPAA, FUNNY HA HA contains R-rated foul language.