HALL PASS

Another Raunchy Voyage with a Heart

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: February 25, 2011

Starring: Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis, Jenna Fischer, Christina Applegate, Richard Jenkins

Genre: Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 106 minutes

Address Comments To:

Jeffrey L. Bewkes, CEO, Time Warner
Barry M. Meyer, Chairman/CEO
Alan Horn, President/COO
Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (New Line Cinema)
Jeff Robinov, President, Warner Bros. Pictures Group
4000 Warner Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91522-0001
Phone: (818) 954-6000
Website: www.movies.warnerbros.com

Content:

(PaPa, BB, C, LLL, V, SSS, NNN, AA, DDD, MMM) Strong mixed pagan worldview with strong immoral content but strong moral elements like in a morality tale where the protagonists make immoral choices, but everything goes wrong, they regret their bad choices, marriage is eventually affirmed, and there are some redemptive elements at the end stressing forgiveness; at least 43 obscenities (including a few “f” words) and several light profanities, plus man defecates in a sandtrap on a golf course and drunk woman having to vomit in hotel room suddenly has diarrhea all over a bathroom wall; light comic violence includes man punching a lead character after he makes a pass at his girlfriend, another jealous man vandalizes another lead character’s van with graffiti and beating it with a golf club, man attacked with a crowbar and a handgun, and security men chase protagonists off golf course; very strong sexual content includes many crude references and discussion, constant commentary on women and male/female encounters, wives give husbands permission to be unfaithful for one week, adulterous kissing, married man fakes doing oral sex on woman because he’s actually afraid of going through with it, implied adultery of one of the wives in the movie but she regrets it, adulterous sex interrupted before anything happens, woman takes off her blouse for married man, but he turns her down, implied male self-abuse; close up full male nudity in one comic scene and upper female nudity in one scene; alcohol use and men get stinking drunk but come to regret it the next day; brief smoking and extensive sequence where men get very high on marijuana filled brownies and play golf stoned; and, constant lying, constant attempts to cheat on spouses by married men but they see by the end that it’s not worthwhile, jealousy, gluttony in one scene, rude and boorish behavior, and vandalism.

Summary:

HALL PASS is a raunchy comedy that follows average suburban men, whose wives allow them a week off from marriage to do what they want, in the hope that the husbands will re-discover the good things they have at home and in their marriage. The final act of HALL PASS affirms monogamy and marriage, but the rest of the movie contains excessively raunchy and outrageous, though often funny, comic craziness.

Review:

HALL PASS is the latest raunchy comedy from the Farrelly Brothers, who earned their fame by crafting 1990s comedy blockbusters DUMB AND DUMBER and THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT MARY.

Here, they follow the exploits of two average suburban family men, Rick and Fred, who are in long-term marriages, yet bored and constantly ogling other women. Their fed-up wives, Maggie and Grace, are told to give them a “Hall Pass” for one week by a psychiatrist friend. The friend says, if the men have a week off from marriage to behave in any bad manner they choose, they will return to their wives after experiencing the frustrations of single life.

The wives, meanwhile, take a week off together and decide to use a Hall Pass as well, although they intend to refrain from actual infidelity. They just want to flirt.

As the week progresses, the buffoonish behavior of the men’s wanton attempts to futilely exploit their lusts contrasts with the wives’ seemingly innocent flirtations. [spoiler alerts] However, it turns out one wife is the one person who actually cheats. Her decision is portrayed as a grave mistake, which makes her husband realize how awful his behavior and attitude have been. They forgive each other, reconcile and resolve to love and appreciate each other forever.

The other couple’s story has a similar resolution. The husband admits to his wife she’s the only woman he has ever been intimate with and ever will. Thus, the movie strongly affirms monogamy and marriage in the end.

HALL PASS is a very funny movie, but most of its laughs are divorced from morality and faith. Those who can handle bad behavior portrayed comically may appreciate and even enjoy the movie’s inventive, non-stop shenanigans and appealing characters, but the movie’s raunchy content remains excessive, whether or not one laughs at the antics of its characters. HALL PASS ends on a positive note, however, and shows the bad consequences of giving into one’s lustful desires.

In Brief:

HALL PASS is the latest raunchy comedy from the Farrelly Brothers, who burst on the Hollywood scene in 1994 with DUMB AND DUMBER. Their new movie follows two average suburban men, Rick and Fred. The men are in long-term marriages, but are bored. They constantly ogle other women. A psychiatrist tells their fed-up wives to give them a “Hall Pass.” The psychiatrist says that, if the men have a week off from marriage to behave as badly as they want, they will return to their wives after experiencing the frustrations of single life. The wives take a week off together. They decide to use a Hall Pass as well, but they just plan to flirt with other guys.

HALL PASS is very funny, but most of its laughs are divorced from morality and faith. Those who can handle bad behavior portrayed comically may appreciate and even enjoy the movie’s inventive, non-stop shenanigans and appealing characters, but the movie’s raunchy content is still excessive, whether or not one laughs at the antics performed by the characters. HALL PASS ends on a positive note, however, affirming monogamy and marriage in the final act.