HUDSON HAWK

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: May 24, 1991

Starring: Bruce Willis, Danny Aiello, Frank Stallone, James Coburn, Sandra Bernhard, & Andie MacDowell.

Genre: Action comedy

Audience: Older teens & adults

Rating: R

Runtime: Approximately 110 minutes

Distributor: Tri-Star

Director: Michael Lehmann

Executive Producer:

Producer: Joel Silver & Michael Dryhurst

Writer: Steven deSouza

Address Comments To:

David Matalon
President
Tri-Star Pictures
1875 Century Park East
Los Angeles, CA 90067
(213) 201 2300.

Content:

(LLL, VVV, S, Ab) Roughly 100 obscenities & profanities; senseless murder & violence; repeated sexual innuendoes; and, mocking Christianity.

Summary:

In HUDSON HAWK, ex-con Hawk (Bruce Willis) goes back to using his expertise as a cat burglar to steal renowned European art treasures in Rome. This film is revolting in its excessive foul language, senseless violence, black humor, and mocking of God and Christianity.

Review:

Sacrilege and senseless violence abound in HUDSON HAWK as Hawk (Bruce Willis) ridicules the Name of Jesus, thanking Him for a cup of cappucino in one breath and uttering obscenities in the next. When Hawk (the world's greatest cat burglar) is released from prison, he is coerced to pilfer three Da Vinci works from European museums but pulls a switch on his new "employers"--much to their chagrin.

Shortly after his release from a New York-based prison, Hawk and his buddy, Tommy, break into an art gallery and steal a prized horse sculpture. In the process, they buffoon the security guards and sing "You Could be Swinging on a Star" while making off with the goods. Hawk's new "employers," the so-called Mayflower group, soon make it clear, through coercion, that he has no choice but to work for them.

Before long, Hawk's "employers" transfer him to Rome where he cases the Vatican setting for Da Vinci's most well-known notebook, one of their prized possessions, kept in a glass case surrounded by security guards. Hawk meets up with art historian Anna in the Vatican and enjoys an exchange of romantic repartee with her. He also discovers that Anna is a woman of the cloth who reports regularly to the Vatican.

Two of the individuals in the Mayflower group, Marilyn and Butterfingers, turn out to be especially cruel and violent. Marilyn proves to be handy with a poisonous dart shooter that paralyzes its victims while Butterfingers applies brute force to anyone he doesn't like. Smarting off about Christianity, Marilyn snidely warns Anna, "Though shalt not share" and speaks of the Lord as her "Boss" in a disparaging way.

Some of the particularly offensive elements in this film, in addition to the foul language, are the grim humor that Marilyn and her cohorts use as they torture people, kill them and "waltz" around their bodies while throwing out one-liner double entendres. The bottom line in this film seems to be that life is a big joke and randomly snuffing out human beings is no big deal.

Despite some spectacular special effects, beware of HUDSON HAWK. It proves once again that the thoughts of unregenerate man's heart are evil (Genesis 6:5).

In Brief: