LADYBIRD, LADYBIRD

Content -2
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: January 01, 1970

Starring: Crissy Rock & Vladmir Vega

Genre: Drama

Audience:

Rating: NR (not rated by the MPAA)

Runtime: 100 minutes

Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Company

Director: Ken Loach

Executive Producer:

Producer: Sally Hibbin

Writer: Rona Munro

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Content:

(B, LLL, V, SS) A non-religious worldview which supports the family against the intrusion of the state; 93 obscenities & 1 profanity; physical attacks on partners; and, fornication & a couple living together without being married.

Summary:

Based on a true story, LADYBIRD, LADYBIRD is the heart-rending account of a woman who has her children taken away from her by the British Social Service and her intense struggle to get them back and rebuild her life. In an effort to make the film as realistic as possible, the filmmaker has included scenes of physical assault, unmarried partners living together and excessive use of obscenities during emotional outbursts.

Review:

Winner of the 1994 Berlin Film Festival's International Critics' Award, LADYBIRD, LADYBIRD is the heart-rending story of a woman who has her children taken away by the British Social Service and her intense struggle to get them back and rebuild her life. Maggie, a single mom of four children, is a part-time singer at a local pub. She tries desperately to keep her family together. However, after a series of tragic events, the British Social Service takes custody of the children. Distraught, Maggie meets Jorge at the pub, a kind, compassionate man, who is a political exile from Paraguay. They start a relationship as Maggie tries to rebuild her shattered life. The film chronicles their loving yet tumultuous relationship and their intense battles with the British Social Service who tries to prevent them from having a family.

The acting in the film is very good. Crissy Rock's performance is compelling as she makes you feel her emotion and pain. Also, Vladimir Vega is good as the loving, stable partner. The direction is excellent. Ken Loach allows the actors the freedom to grab hold of the story and present it with stunning realism and believability. A word of caution must be given because of the film's realism: there are scenes of physical assault, unmarried partners living together and excessive use of obscenities during emotion-filled outbursts.

In Brief: