NO ERES TU, SOY YO (IT'S NOT YOU, IT'S ME) Add To My Top 10

Pagan Love Call

Content -4
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: April 08, 2011

Starring: Eugenio Derbez, Alejandra Barros, Martina Garcia, Juan Ríos,

Genre: Romantic Comedy

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 100 minutes

Address Comments To:

Paul Presburger, CEO
James N. McNamara, Chairman
Pantelion Films (A partnership between Lionsgate Entertainment and Grupo Televiso)
Website: www.pantelionfilms.com
Email: [email protected]

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFR, L, V, SS, N, AA, MM) Very strong pagan worldview with some false New Age pagan, Buddhist, Hindu references by protagonist’s parents but in a comical vein; five mostly light obscenities; some light violence includes light fixture falls and hits DJ equipment at a party but no one is hurt, implied surgery, large dog knocks things over, older man collapses and is taken to a hospital, some brief thoughts of suicide in one brief sequence; depicted nude hugging from waist up in three or four scenes/shots, implied pre-marital sex several times, passionate kissing, and man sticks tongue in former girlfriend’s ear but she then tells him she’s married though he thought they were on a dinner date; upper male nudity and bare backs shown; alcohol use and drunkenness; no smoking or drugs; and, drunken psychiatrist tells exasperating depressed patient to go kill himself, large dog gives birth to several puppies, man’s new bride leaves him suddenly for another man but later tries to come back, self-pity, and protagonist becomes depressed.


Summary:

NO ERES TU, SOY YO, or IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME, is a romantic comedy from Mexico. In it, a young cardiologist in Mexico City named Javier gets thrown for a loop when his new bride suddenly breaks up with him. With some foul language and premarital sexual situations, IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME is mostly a comic portrayal of a neurotic man lost in a pagan wilderness of ungodly love and romance.


Review:

NO ERES TU, SOY YO (aka IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME) is a romantic comedy from Mexico. It’s about a cardiologist who has troubles at work and troubles at home when his new bride breaks up with him. The movie is a comical depiction of a modern middle-class pagan living in Mexico City and his mixed up love life.
Javier is a Mexico City cardiologist who isn’t being given a chance to lead his own operations. Matters are made worse when Javier, upset about some problems with his girlfriend, Maria, accidentally starts to cut a patient before the anesthesia takes hold.
Back at home, Maria suggests Javier return with her to Miami, where she lived for 10 years. She thinks he can get a chance to lead his own operations through a doctor they know there. To seal the deal, Javier asks Maria to marry him, and she says yes.
However, when Maria travels ahead to set up things in Miami for them, she phones Javier just as he’s about to reach the airport to fly out to her. She informs him that she’s taken up with another doctor they know and doesn’t want him to come to America. “It’s not you, it’s me,” Maria tells Javier.
Javier is completely devastated by this news. It doesn’t help that he just asked for a three-month leave of absence from work, sold his car, and rented out his apartment. He moves back in with his parents, who are some kind of New Age partiers.
Javier makes everyone miserable with his depression and self-pity, including his best friend and the psychiatrist his father suggested. He keeps asking people for advice about women, but no one gives him the advice he likes. For example, when his best friend Martin suggests he start dating other women again, Javier gets upset and accuses Martin and his wife, Laura, of getting a secret phone call from Maria. “Traitors!” he shouts to them as he walks out the door.
Will Javier stop feeling sorry for himself? Will he hook up with the pretty young clerk at the pet store where the owner sneakily sells Javier a Great Dane puppy? Will Maria get tired of the other doctor and return to Mexico? These are some of the questions the second half of the movie answers.
IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME doesn’t really have any moral content to it. As for religion, there are some comical references to the New Age beliefs of the romantic hero’s parents, which include some Buddhism and some Hinduism. In one scene, the hero tries focusing on his Hindu chakras like his parents do, but it doesn’t help him. All in all, therefore, the movie is mostly a comic portrayal of a neurotic man lost in a pagan wilderness of unbiblical love and romance. As such, it’s not the most offensive portrayal ever made of such a thing, but it is still immoral and amoral and, therefore, abhorrent.
Of course, marriage and relationships can only work well when God or Jesus Christ is at the center of them. When we don’t focus on God and Jesus Christ, we and our friends, spouses, families, and colleagues are truly lost.
IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME also has plenty of mostly light foul language. It also has several shots of implied nude scenes where the romantic hero hugs his new fiancé or his new girlfriend with their shirts off. They are hugging closely in these scenes, so nothing really explicit is shown.


In Brief:

NO ERES TU, SOY YO, or IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME, is a romantic comedy from Mexico. Javier, a young cardiologist in Mexico City, gets thrown for a loop when his new bride breaks up with him. He moves back in with his parents, who are some kind of New Age partiers. Javier makes everyone miserable with his depression and self-pity. Including his best friend and the psychiatrist his father suggested. He keeps asking people for advice about women, but no one gives him the advice he likes. Will Javier ever stop feeling sorry for himself?
IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME doesn’t have any moral content to it. There are, however, some comical references to the New Age beliefs of the romantic hero’s parents, including some Buddhist and Hindu references. In one scene, the hero tries focusing on his Hindu chakras like his parents, but it doesn’t help. Thus, the movie is a comic portrayal of a neurotic man lost in a pagan wilderness of ungodly love and romance. As such, it’s not the most offensive portrayal ever made of such a thing, but it’s still immoral, amoral, and, therefore, abhorrent.