SCREAM 2

Copycat Killer

Content -3
Quality
None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        

Release Date: December 12, 1997

Starring: Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox,
David Arquette, Jamie Kennedy,
Duane Martin, & Laurie Metcalf

Genre: Horror

Audience: Older teenagers and adults

Rating: R

Runtime: 120 minutes

Distributor: Dimension Films

Director: Wes Craven

Executive Producer: Bob Weinstein, Harvey
Weinstein & Kevin Williamson

Producer: Cathy Konrad & Marianne
Maddalena

Writer: Kevin Williamson

Address Comments To:

Harvey and Robert Weinstein, Co-Chairmen
Miramax Films
Tribeca Film Center
375 Greenwich Street
New York, NY 10013-2338
(212) 941-3800

Content:

(H, O, B, LLL, VV, N, A). Humanist worldview with occult and moral elements; 31 obscenities, two profanities & five vulgarities; moderate but bloody violence including man stabbed through head, woman stabbed in crowded movie theater, woman stabbed then thrown off balcony, man stabbed to death in van, policeman murdered in car, policeman killed while car speeds through streets, several other people shot by revolvers, & other people stabbed but survive; upper male nudity; alcohol use; and, miscellaneous immorality such as death threats, misusing the media to gain fame & taking revenge.


Summary:

A knife-wielding copycat killer wearing a scary ghost costume terrorizes college student Sidney, a group of her college friends, a handicapped police deputy, and a TV reporter in SCREAM 2, a horror film sequel. Many teenagers will go see this film as a youthful lark, but although good ultimately defeats evil in the story the movie treats bloody mass murder as a superficial thrill ride and is thus dehumanizing rather than uplifting.


Review:

In the original SCREAM movie, a knife-wielding killer dressed in a scary ghost costume terrorizes a group of young people, including high school student Sidney, her friend Randy, a police deputy, and an ambitious TV reporter. In the sequel, a copycat killer menaces college students Sidney and Randy, their friends, the ex-deputy who’s now slightly handicapped by the earlier ordeal, and the TV reporter. Many teenagers will go see this film as a youthful lark, but although good ultimately defeats evil in the story the movie treats bloody mass murder as a superficial thrill ride. Scientific research, reported by MOVIEGUIDE, shows that many people will be dehumanized or traumatized by such material and a few already-disturbed individuals will be spurred on to create their own mayhem.
SCREAM 2 begins with the screening of a horror movie based on TV reporter Gale Weathers’ book on the murders that she, Sidney, Randy, and Deputy Riley survived in SCREAM. A black woman is brutally slain by a new killer dressed in the same costume worn in the previous incidents, while audience members also dressed in the costume frolic then stare in shock and terror as they realize what’s really happening. News of that and two other murders puts Sidney and her friends on their guard. Then, the new killer starts calling Sidney on the phone, and the film becomes a terrifying but shallow chase to see if Sidney and her friends can stop the killer before he murders them all.
Neve Campbell again plays Sidney with sensitivity and inner strength while Jamie Kennedy almost steals the show again as the witty Randy. Kennedy’s character is a horror film fan. The sequel uses his comments to spice its own theme of violence in the media and the fame it can bring, not only to reporters, film directors and book authors but also real-life killers. SCREAM 2, however, ultimately seems to accept the false idea that violence in the media, whether on the news or in the movie theater, has little or no effect on people and can be used to help criminals plead insanity. Director Wes Craven and writer/executive producer Kevin Williamson should have paid more attention to the finer points of character and story if they wanted to create a movie that truly has something worthwhile to say about such an important social issue.
In addition to the litany of violence in the movie, SCREAM 2 contains numerous obscenities. That, coupled with the gratuitous violence and the movie’s cavalier treatment of the demonic ghost costume, make SCREAM 2 an immoral film that fails to overcome its tale of good overcoming evil.


In Brief:

In the original SCREAM movie, a knife-wielding killer dressed in a scary ghost costume terrorizes a group of young people, including high school student Sidney, her friend Randy, a police deputy, and an ambitious TV reporter. In SCREAM 2, a copycat killer menaces college students Sidney and Randy, their friends, the ex-deputy who’s now slightly handicapped by the earlier ordeal, and the TV reporter.
Teenagers will go see this film as a lark, although it treats bloody mass murder as a superficial thrill ride. Research shows that many people will be dehumanized by such material and a few disturbed individuals will be inspired to create their own mayhem. Neve Campbell plays Sidney with sensitivity while Jamie Kennedy almost steals the show as the witty Randy. Randy’s comments spice up the theme of violence in the media and the fame it can bring to reporters, film directors, book authors, and real-life killers. SCREAM 2 seems to accept the false idea that violence in the media has little on people and can be used to help criminals plead insanity. Director Wes Craven should have paid more attention to the truth if he wanted to create a movie that has something worthwhile to say about such an important social issue